79 collections

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The collection consists of audio recordings and segments of various programs penned by Sloane, as well as recordings of some of his lectures, interviews, and phone conferences. Among the programs available are The Right to Live (1947, NBC) and Joy of Bach (1978). The only videocassette in the collection is a recording of part one of Kids Like These.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The collection consists of hundreds of hours of Arnold Michaelis' audio, film, and video interviews with the world's leading political and cultural personalities recorded since 1958. Martin Luther King, Jr., Adlai Stevenson, Dean Rusk, Ronald Reagan, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Indira Gandhi are just a few of the men and women interviewed by Mr. Michaelis in their own homes. Arnold Michaelis sought "to record for today and posterity, the flavor of the thinking and the essence of the ideas of the men and women whose lives will be studied by future generations." The bulk of the collection is made up of films, television programs, and radio programs that Michaelis produced, and elements used in those productions. The majority of the audiotapes in the collection consist of interviews, edited and unedited, with celebrities and political figures.

The collection consists of 14 Bankers boxes of audiocasssettes containing over 3100 radio programs taped off-air. Programs include: That Was the Week That Was; Frontier Gentleman; G.I. Journal; The Cavalcade of America; Studio One; Lum and Abner, etc.

This collection contains films, videos, and radio spots produced by the Atlanta Gas Light Company from the 1950s through 1970s. It includes home movies of company events, training and promotional films, commercials, and footage of the Mrs. Georgia Pageant in the 1960s.

The collection consists of Williams family home movies shot between 1942 and 1960. They show typical family scenes, such as holiday celebrations, childrens' birthday parties, a wedding, trips to the beach, winter ice storms, picnics, a family reunion, and several shots of downtown Monroe, as well as a Monroe church and Sunday school letting out. Of local interest are 1948 scenes of a demonstration farm in Winder, Georgia, and the turkeys and cows of the Williams' family farm. Grant Park in Atlanta and its zoo are also featured several times. Both a Girl Scout camp and a Boy Scout camp are shown. Also, the earlier films taken during WWII show a captured Japanese submarine touring through Monroe. A 1943 Victory Parade includes children promoting scrap drives, victory gardening, an air raid group, and representations of the Four Freedoms. A recruiting drive in downtown Monroe features a damaged Luftwaffe warbird, and a dirigible patrols the shoreline while the family is at the beach. The bulk of the films are travel scenes by the family and also of Booth Williams at national conventions in Florida and Wichita. A 1949 trip from Georgia to the Western U.S. begins on U.S. Highway 41 and documents a portion of Peacock Alley - a country store selling chenille bedspreads, aprons, and bathrobes. Travels include: Stone Mountain, Georgia (view from top); Vogel State Park in north Georgia; the old market at Louisville, Georgia; Lookout Mountain, Georgia, and Point Park; Gatlinburg, Tennessee and Cherokee, North Carolina; Asheville, North Carolina, including a view of the Grove Park Inn; Edisto Beach, South Carolina; Florida: St. Augustine, Crystal River, Cypress Gardens, Gainesville, New Orleans, orange groves/packing houses; Texas: Houston, King Ranch cattle, San Antonio, Alamo; Louisville, Kentucky, Keeneland race track; Chicago, Illinois (cityscape and Shriners); Spokane, Washington; Western states trip (Omaha, Nebraska; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Badlands, South Dakota; Cedar Pass Lodge; Mount Rushmore; Yellowstone National Park; Salt Creek Falls, Oregon; Crater Lake Park, Oregon; California Redwoods, San Francisco, Yosemite, Los Angeles/Glendale, Hollywood Bowl, UCLA; Reno, Nevada; Hoover Dam; Grand Canyon; Petrified Forest and trading post; Salt Lake City, copper pit, Great Salt Lake, Reno; Cliff House (San Francisco); Disneyland); and the Northeastern United States and Canada, including the border crossing, and the White Mountains cog railway in New Hampshire.

The collection consists of home movies from Brice Nelson. Highlights include travel footage from Europe in 1956 (Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Vienna, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Heidelberg, the Rhine River), Washington D.C., Mount Vernon and the Rock of Gibraltar. There is also footage of birthday and Christmas celebrations.

The collection consists of home movies of the Cearley family. Included are scenes of Georgia, California, Idaho, Dallas, Galveston, Fort Worth, Hawaii, Okinawa, and Oklahoma.

Interviews of Coburn by Victor Rosen from November 1955-April 1956.

Recordings of church services and choral and gospel music. Many recordings occurred at historically black colleges and universities (HCBUs) and African American churches. 

The collection consists of home movies from David Mitchell's family. Scenes include Easter celebrations; footage of Dellinger, Georgia; footage of Daytona and Fort Myers, Florida; and footage of Alabama.

Recordings of The Lighthouse, Urban League Broadcast on WBNS, interview of Elizabeth Kytle by Andrew Freeman, and an interview of Elizabeth Kytle by Fannie Hurst.

The collection consists of sound recordings of Elmo Ellis editorials.

The collection consists of home movies of Nell Epps and her family, dating from 1938-1970. There is footage of a pool and a garden, as well as some footage of Athens, Georgia.

The Ethridge home movies depict life on Southern farm land which was originally settled in 1799 and is now known as the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. The films specifically document the mid-20th century (since 1939), showing Georgia farm life, and the family and Southern travels of Ira Lanis Ethridge.

The collection consists of home movies from the Foley family. Also included are two commercially-produced reels of Kodak: 1.) "Cinegraph Eight: Midnight on a Pullman," no. 84550 available from Dec. 1932 to Dec. 1943, being an excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "In New York," and, 2.) "Always in Trouble," no. 84546 available from September 1932 and discontinued in December 1943. Excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "It's a Bear." In addition, there is one commercially-produced audio testing reel, "Norelco 101 Demonstration Tape 1-7/8 two track battery operated transistor tape recorder," with seven songs on each side.

The collection consists of home movies of Frank Sheffield of Americus, Georgia and his family, recorded over a period of forty years, from 1925-1965. Highlights include footage of England in the 1930s (Trafalgar Square, opening of Parliament, street scenes, the Thames, Whipsnade Zoo, Queen Mary in the historic royal coach); the Harrold-Sheffield wedding; the Sheffields' honeymoon at Lakemont; a dinner party thrown by the Sheffields in 1932; the Sheffield and Harrold family servants; Lindbergh's transatlantic flight; scenes of Americus, Georgia; New Orleans in the 1940s; pyramids in Yucatan, Cuervavaca and Taxco; a Southern Field Flying Jennie airshow from the 1960s; and a trip to Cape Cod.

The collection consists of John Newman's home movies, including a reel of construction sites of buildings built by his father's construction business, Newman Construction Company; Newman Construction Company's projects in 1937, 1938 and 1939 (including several Public Works Administration projects); and one short reel of John F. Kennedy's appearance at the La Grange, Georgia, airport in October 1960. Other scenes from Newman's home movies include children's birthdays, holidays, a wedding (with footage of the bride preparing for the ceremony and the table of gifts), Panama City (Florida), Christmas, and school pageants, as well as other scenes around LaGrange, Georgia. The films were shot by John R. Newman (father of Fred Newman) and Claire Newman.

The collection consists of home movies of Fred Ware's life, dating from the 1930s to the 1960s. Included is footage of Fred as a baby; the family dog; trips to London, Florida, Tallulah Gorge, Dallas, various locations in Europe, and Jamaica; camping and fishing excursions; and Fred's first car.

The collection consists of home movies from the family of Dr. Gail Jackson. Included is footage of a 1947 road trip on Route 66 West from Joplin, Missouri to Flagstaff, Arizona, the Grand Canyon, Utah and Colorado, and other locations; a 1948 trip through the Tetons, Yellowstone, Cheyenne, etc, and a dude ranch; a Castle Heights graduation featuring Bernarr MacFadden; an Officer Candidate School graduation in Newport, Rhode Island; and miscellaneous events in the family's life, such as scenes of the farm and home, snow in Vincennes, and a birthday party for Frederic L. Jackson.

The collection consists of 12 reels of film that once formed Moore's personal collection of kinescopes from various programs he had a part in over the years. These reels provide insight into what Garry Moore deemed important or amusing and worth keeping in his personal collection. The collection includes the Edward R. Murrow "Person to Person" interview at the Moore home in February 1955. Also included are clips from I've Got a Secret, the Gary Moore Show, Garry's Gags, and a home movie of a cruise to Virgin Islands.

The collection consists of six reels of home movies showing an outdoor baseball game, a train yard and railroad crew, children playing, beach scenes in Florida, cleanup of a train wreck, and outdoor snow scenes.

The collection consists of home movies of Geneva Grant's family. Included is footage of Macon, Georgia; a wedding; the family's home; Christmas; Hollywood Beach and Miami, Florida; and Six Flags Over Georgia shortly after it opened.

This collection is made up of several different groups of film and videotape which have come to the Media Archives since 1995. As with many collections, not everything produced by the Georgia Center is in the Media Archives, but we hold a broad representation of their material. The Georgia Center and the UGA Art Department at one time maintained a storage building where a once-circulating collection of educational and industrial films were stored. Those films eventually came to the Libraries' Media Archives and have been called the Georgia Center Film Collection. When the Media Archives was established in 1995, those films were brought here. Some of the films date back to the 1930s, though it is likely that these are later reprinted copies of earlier-produced films. The earliest known 2" videotape of a Georgia Center production that we hold was donated to us by Patrick Shields, "A Day with Jimmie Driftwood" which we believe dates to the early 1960s. In 2004, we received the bulk of the Georgia Center's taped programs consisting of tapes of educational programs on campus, continuing education programs, and original productions. A broad range of subjects is covered, including famous Georgians (Dean Rusk, Lamar Dodd, et al.), educational materials, and significant events at the University, among many others.

The collection consists of over 500 film reels from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Topics covered include parks and historic sites (e.g. Tallulah Falls, Fort McAllister), hunting, fish (especially trout), birds (woodpeckers, eagles, etc), wildlife (e.g. white-tailed deer), various locations around Georgia (Atlanta, Sapelo Island, etc) and incidents in Georgia history. The collection spans the 1970s through the 1990s, but is not a complete archive of all the unit's output. Also included is film footage collected by the department, dating to the 1950s.

Audio field recordings made in coastal and North Georgia by Art Rosenbaum, primarily between 1976 and 1983, with one each from 1955 and 1966. Musicians were recorded in their homes and churches. Some oral histories are included along with performances. Genres represented include old-time string band music, gospel, ballads, blues, work songs, shout songs, banjo picking, and religious singing. Performers include the McIntosh County Shouters, Howard Finster, Neal Pattman, Gordon Tanner, Joe Rakestraw, Jake Staggers, the Eller Brothers with Ross Brown, Doc and Lucy Barnes, and W. Guy Bruce.

Major Gibson’s black and white and color home movies span 1942 through 1954 and document family life in base housing, time off with several groups of friends, the interior of base offices, bomber aircraft, and a parade in Butler, Georgia. Particularly of interest is footage of the Gibsons’ son, Bill, as an infant in what is a very typical family home movie scene - walking and crawling on the lawn outside the home with his mother, Wilma. What was a rather ordinary scene becomes more interesting when Mrs. Gibson holds up in front of young Bill a sign reading "14 August 1945 V-J Day Today."

The collection consists of home movies from the Hammond family. Included are scenes from World War II, home life, Christmas, a farm and a lake.

The collection consists of footage of Gordon and Macon (including downtown scenes), Georgia, and families based in Gordon. There are also some early home movies of a kaolin mine's operation that were transferred from their original 16mm to VHS in the 1980s ; the Walter J. Brown Media Archive does not have the original 16mm film. Also included is footage of numerous beach vacation trips in Georgia and Florida, mountain trips, picnics, a trip to England and Scotland, scenes of Central of Georgia railroad trains and stations, a mobile x-ray clinic for tuberculosis, family pets (cat and dog), birthday parties, Zoo Atlanta, Willie B. II gorilla, petting zoos, parades (including centennial of the Civil War parade and a Halloween parade), the Gordon mines, Rock Eagle, Warner Robbins, and miscellaneous family footage.
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