8 collections

genre:

The collection consists of hundreds of hours of Arnold Michaelis' audio, film, and video interviews with the world's leading political and cultural personalities recorded since 1958. Martin Luther King, Jr., Adlai Stevenson, Dean Rusk, Ronald Reagan, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Indira Gandhi are just a few of the men and women interviewed by Mr. Michaelis in their own homes. Arnold Michaelis sought "to record for today and posterity, the flavor of the thinking and the essence of the ideas of the men and women whose lives will be studied by future generations." The bulk of the collection is made up of films, television programs, and radio programs that Michaelis produced, and elements used in those productions. The majority of the audiotapes in the collection consist of interviews, edited and unedited, with celebrities and political figures.

The Media Archives holdings of "Cinema Showcase" include completed as-aired programs as well as raw footage for the program. The archival material exists on various formats of videotape and on 16mm film. Transfers have been made of several programs for viewing and research; additional transfers can be made by request but transfers are dependent upon condition and format. We require 24-48 hours lead time to inspect the original materials; additional time may be required to transfer certain formats. Audio materials from Whaley's radio program Cinema Soundtrack are as yet uncataloged.

For 35 years, Foxfire has been collecting history of the Southern Appalachian region, its people, and their ways of life. Starting with the publication of the first issue of The Foxfire Magazine in March 1967, Foxfire students have collected over 2,500 hours of taped interviews, more than 80,000 black and white negatives and photos, over 10,000 color slides, and 1,100 videotaped interviews with the elders of the Appalachian region. A unique feature of the audiotaped, videotaped, and photographic collections is that the information was collected by high school students, transcribed for the most part by hand, and published in The Foxfire Magazine and book series. The archives include a large amount of data never published.

The collection consists of 12 reels of film that once formed Moore's personal collection of kinescopes from various programs he had a part in over the years. These reels provide insight into what Garry Moore deemed important or amusing and worth keeping in his personal collection. The collection includes the Edward R. Murrow "Person to Person" interview at the Moore home in February 1955. Also included are clips from I've Got a Secret, the Gary Moore Show, Garry's Gags, and a home movie of a cruise to Virgin Islands.

The collection consists of production elements and video recordings of interviews and other footage related to Harry Crews and to the making of the documentary "Harry Crews: Guilty as Charged."

The collection consists of: 1. Eighty-six 30-minute Dictabelts of poor to average audio quality, roughly half of them labeled "Bacon County" and apparently dictated by Crews during research and composition (circa 1974-1976) of his memoir A Childhood: The Biography of A Place. Other Dictabelt subjects include: (1) "Overdrive" interview(s) for 1977 Esquire article, (2) "The Trucker Militant"; (3) "Polo Lounge" [Beverly Hills]; and (4) Southern Express (unproduced screenplay). 2. Twenty-three videotapes, mostly multiple copies of two documentary films -- The Rough South of Harry Crews (1993) and Harry Crews: Guilty as Charged (1992). Also includes multiple NTSC copies of Crews' 1996 appearance on French TV station Canal+ program "Nulle Part Ailleurs," and original SECAM format dub; copies of Crews' acceptance remarks for Georgia Writers Hall of Fame award (December 2002) and a copy of feature film The Indian Runner, with Crews' cameo appearance. 3. Forty-three audiotape cassettes, chiefly from Crews' magazine assignments in 1970s and 1980s; also interviews with him 1979-1999 from various sources, and one partial recording of creative writing lecture/class. Please see the online finding aid for a complete list of available materials.

The Richard Nixon/Frank Gannon interviews consist of more than 30 hours of videotapes interviews with former President Richard Nixon. The interviews took place nearly a decade after Nixon's resignation, and were conducted with the benefit of some historical perspective and without media hype. They were made in four groups and two- and three-day sessions spread over seven months in 1983. Each interview was organized around a specific topic or topics. Issues discussed include Nixon's early political career, Vietnam, China, the Soviet Union, the Middle East, the Watergate scandal and Nixon's resignation as president, U.S. domestic policies, U.S. presidents, and foreign leaders. These interviews, conducted by Frank Gannon, former employee and trusted friend of Richard Nixon, represent Nixon's most substantial and lengthy post-presidency interview.

To view indexes and synced transcripts for each interview, please visit the Nixon-Gannon Interviews OHMS page.

The collection consists of programming from WATL's "Sunday News Conference," covering the period from 1990-1996 (with some exclusions). Topics include public affairs, Rick Shaw's Swan Song, Super Bowl Sunday 1996, and an undated interview with Franklin Garrett.
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