124 collections

collection area:

One reel (c. 1955) shows someone plowing a sandy field. The other is also of plowing, but appears to be double exposed or that the film jumped in the camera.

Because of its business and housing content, we believe this 16mm color amateur film of scenes in and around Athens was made by Joel A. Wier. We date the original film to 1947 because the films screening at the downtown theaters - the Ritz, the Georgia, and the Palace - are "The Dark Corner" (released in April 1946), "The Jolson Story" (released in October 1946), "The Razor's Edge" (released in December 1946), and "Valley of Fear" (released in February 1947). The two earlier films may have taken some time to get to Athens after their initial New York and Los Angeles premieres. The more striking aspects of the footage are the extreme differences shown between the houses along Milledge and Prince Avenues, and the African-American neighborhoods, as well as the then fairly new public housing and apartments along Broad Street. These neighborhoods have been identified as "Tip Toe Alley" (between Finley and Newton Streets at Baxter Street) and "Linnentown" (Lumpkin near Baxter), both of which were razed for public housing and for University of Georgia expansion. Also included is footage of local service organization members (Kiwanis, Pilot Club) gathering for lunch downtown, local bankers and businessmen outside their buildings, a scene of the Chamber of Commerce building, aerial views of Athens, a livestock auction at the Northeast Georgia Livestock Association building, a Shriners parade downtown, the airport, UGA campus scenes, the Garden Club of Georgia's Founders Garden, a golf course, Athens General Hospital, and the Rodgers Hosiery Company.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The collection consists of one silent film of people from a small town edited with title cards that are meant to be humorous.

Films documenting travel to Mexico, Barbados, Nassau, England, and home.

1969-1975

The collection consists of one reel of silent, black and white home movies from the Battle family. Highlights include footage of a 1939 firemen's convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey; the Battle family on Atlantic City boardwalk; and the 1939 New Jersey & New York Volunteer Firemen's Association (NJNYVFA) firemen's parade in Lyndhurst, New Jersey. The parade is shot from a static camera position as the marchers move past the camera. Participants include fire departments and their trucks, drum and bugle corps, Boy Scouts, women's auxiliary groups, and bands from the towns of Demarest, Midland Park, Mahwah, Westwood, Fairview, Emerson, Rochelle Park, and Grandview, New Jersey.

The collection consists of home movies featuring the Belcher family, birthdays, Fox Lake, Thanksgiving 1964, and Christmas 1964.

The collection consists of home movies of the Finley and Miller families (especially "Duddy" Finley, Elizabeth "Lady Bug" Peirce Miller, Harry Miller, and Lady's Bug's parents) from the late 1920s taken in Chicago, Ill., Canaan, Conn., Wisconsin, and Niagara Falls, N.Y. Reel 1 is from 1926 and features Duddy Finley on a tricycle in a park with her mother and Harry Miller; there are also scenes around Chicago Navy Pier and Lincoln Park. Reel 2 (1926) contains scenes of Lady Bug's family playing in the snow, a shot of a downtown street in Canaan with "Ives & Peirce Coal & Grain" store. Reel 3 (1927) shows the family swimming at Twin Lakes, a playground, children dancing, a girl doing the Charleston dance, and other family scenes. Reel 4 (1928) contains swimming scenes, adults dressed in Victorian clothing, girls dancing, and a cat. The last reel (no. 5, 1929) features wire-haired terriers and puppies in a backyard, little girls paying with dolls and a dollhouse, a large country house in winter, a sign reading "Barry Kennels: Equally Well Known Both Sides of Atlantic, Owned by Roger Phillips," dogs in kennels in the snow, the family in snow, a lakeside community, and Niagara Falls.

The collection consists of Williams family home movies shot between 1942 and 1960. They show typical family scenes, such as holiday celebrations, childrens' birthday parties, a wedding, trips to the beach, winter ice storms, picnics, a family reunion, and several shots of downtown Monroe, as well as a Monroe church and Sunday school letting out. Of local interest are 1948 scenes of a demonstration farm in Winder, Georgia, and the turkeys and cows of the Williams' family farm. Grant Park in Atlanta and its zoo are also featured several times. Both a Girl Scout camp and a Boy Scout camp are shown. Also, the earlier films taken during WWII show a captured Japanese submarine touring through Monroe. A 1943 Victory Parade includes children promoting scrap drives, victory gardening, an air raid group, and representations of the Four Freedoms. A recruiting drive in downtown Monroe features a damaged Luftwaffe warbird, and a dirigible patrols the shoreline while the family is at the beach. The bulk of the films are travel scenes by the family and also of Booth Williams at national conventions in Florida and Wichita. A 1949 trip from Georgia to the Western U.S. begins on U.S. Highway 41 and documents a portion of Peacock Alley - a country store selling chenille bedspreads, aprons, and bathrobes. Travels include: Stone Mountain, Georgia (view from top); Vogel State Park in north Georgia; the old market at Louisville, Georgia; Lookout Mountain, Georgia, and Point Park; Gatlinburg, Tennessee and Cherokee, North Carolina; Asheville, North Carolina, including a view of the Grove Park Inn; Edisto Beach, South Carolina; Florida: St. Augustine, Crystal River, Cypress Gardens, Gainesville, New Orleans, orange groves/packing houses; Texas: Houston, King Ranch cattle, San Antonio, Alamo; Louisville, Kentucky, Keeneland race track; Chicago, Illinois (cityscape and Shriners); Spokane, Washington; Western states trip (Omaha, Nebraska; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Badlands, South Dakota; Cedar Pass Lodge; Mount Rushmore; Yellowstone National Park; Salt Creek Falls, Oregon; Crater Lake Park, Oregon; California Redwoods, San Francisco, Yosemite, Los Angeles/Glendale, Hollywood Bowl, UCLA; Reno, Nevada; Hoover Dam; Grand Canyon; Petrified Forest and trading post; Salt Lake City, copper pit, Great Salt Lake, Reno; Cliff House (San Francisco); Disneyland); and the Northeastern United States and Canada, including the border crossing, and the White Mountains cog railway in New Hampshire.

The collection consists of home movies from Brice Nelson. Highlights include travel footage from Europe in 1956 (Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Vienna, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Heidelberg, the Rhine River), Washington D.C., Mount Vernon and the Rock of Gibraltar. There is also footage of birthday and Christmas celebrations.

The collection consists of home movies of the Cearley family. Included are scenes of Georgia, California, Idaho, Dallas, Galveston, Fort Worth, Hawaii, Okinawa, and Oklahoma.

The collection consists of family home scenes in Alabama in the early- to mid-1960s including baby bath time, Christmas, snow scenes, a cemetery visit, a highway trip to Chattanooga (gasoline selling at 27 cents/gallon), the Smokey Mountains, a small zoo, downtown Scottsboro, AL; a winter ice storm; the Sam Houston historic schoolhouse in Maryville, Tennessee; and a trip to Jamaica.

The collection consists of footage taken from a trip to Barcelona and Costa Brava, Spain, and other family footage taken in Macon, Georgia upon their return from the trip. Much of the footage of Spain is of Bernard's daughters and includes their first communions and various birthday parties. Also included are shots of street festivals, a Palm Sunday festival, and northern Spain (including Viella and the border of France).

The collection consists of home movies from David Mitchell's family. Scenes include Easter celebrations; footage of Dellinger, Georgia; footage of Daytona and Fort Myers, Florida; and footage of Alabama.

The collection consists of home movies of Nell Epps and her family, dating from 1938-1970. There is footage of a pool and a garden, as well as some footage of Athens, Georgia.

The Ethridge home movies depict life on Southern farm land which was originally settled in 1799 and is now known as the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. The films specifically document the mid-20th century (since 1939), showing Georgia farm life, and the family and Southern travels of Ira Lanis Ethridge.

The collection consists of home movies from the Foley family. Also included are two commercially-produced reels of Kodak: 1.) "Cinegraph Eight: Midnight on a Pullman," no. 84550 available from Dec. 1932 to Dec. 1943, being an excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "In New York," and, 2.) "Always in Trouble," no. 84546 available from September 1932 and discontinued in December 1943. Excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "It's a Bear." In addition, there is one commercially-produced audio testing reel, "Norelco 101 Demonstration Tape 1-7/8 two track battery operated transistor tape recorder," with seven songs on each side.
Next 36