99 collections

date:

The collection consists of audio recordings and segments of various programs penned by Sloane, as well as recordings of some of his lectures, interviews, and phone conferences. Among the programs available are The Right to Live (1947, NBC) and Joy of Bach (1978). The only videocassette in the collection is a recording of part one of Kids Like These.

The collection consists of hundreds of hours of Arnold Michaelis' audio, film, and video interviews with the world's leading political and cultural personalities recorded since 1958. Martin Luther King, Jr., Adlai Stevenson, Dean Rusk, Ronald Reagan, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Indira Gandhi are just a few of the men and women interviewed by Mr. Michaelis in their own homes. Arnold Michaelis sought "to record for today and posterity, the flavor of the thinking and the essence of the ideas of the men and women whose lives will be studied by future generations." The bulk of the collection is made up of films, television programs, and radio programs that Michaelis produced, and elements used in those productions. The majority of the audiotapes in the collection consist of interviews, edited and unedited, with celebrities and political figures.

The collection consists of 14 Bankers boxes of audiocasssettes containing over 3100 radio programs taped off-air. Programs include: That Was the Week That Was; Frontier Gentleman; G.I. Journal; The Cavalcade of America; Studio One; Lum and Abner, etc.

Film and audio recordings that accompany Roaring Fork Press. Aspen : the Magazine in a Box. Aspen Communications Inc., 1965. https://galileo-usg-uga-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/f/v7b6bh/01GALI_USG_ALMA71118482740002931
 

This collection contains films, videos, and radio spots produced by the Atlanta Gas Light Company from the 1950s through 1970s. It includes home movies of company events, training and promotional films, commercials, and footage of the Mrs. Georgia Pageant in the 1960s.

Includes audio recordings of Dateline America, The World Today (1983-1984), and Georgia Crossroads (1983) and several films including Ernest Vandiver in Milledgeville, Georgia.

1969-1975

The collection consists of home movies featuring the Belcher family, birthdays, Fox Lake, Thanksgiving 1964, and Christmas 1964.

The collection consists of Williams family home movies shot between 1942 and 1960. They show typical family scenes, such as holiday celebrations, childrens' birthday parties, a wedding, trips to the beach, winter ice storms, picnics, a family reunion, and several shots of downtown Monroe, as well as a Monroe church and Sunday school letting out. Of local interest are 1948 scenes of a demonstration farm in Winder, Georgia, and the turkeys and cows of the Williams' family farm. Grant Park in Atlanta and its zoo are also featured several times. Both a Girl Scout camp and a Boy Scout camp are shown. Also, the earlier films taken during WWII show a captured Japanese submarine touring through Monroe. A 1943 Victory Parade includes children promoting scrap drives, victory gardening, an air raid group, and representations of the Four Freedoms. A recruiting drive in downtown Monroe features a damaged Luftwaffe warbird, and a dirigible patrols the shoreline while the family is at the beach. The bulk of the films are travel scenes by the family and also of Booth Williams at national conventions in Florida and Wichita. A 1949 trip from Georgia to the Western U.S. begins on U.S. Highway 41 and documents a portion of Peacock Alley - a country store selling chenille bedspreads, aprons, and bathrobes. Travels include: Stone Mountain, Georgia (view from top); Vogel State Park in north Georgia; the old market at Louisville, Georgia; Lookout Mountain, Georgia, and Point Park; Gatlinburg, Tennessee and Cherokee, North Carolina; Asheville, North Carolina, including a view of the Grove Park Inn; Edisto Beach, South Carolina; Florida: St. Augustine, Crystal River, Cypress Gardens, Gainesville, New Orleans, orange groves/packing houses; Texas: Houston, King Ranch cattle, San Antonio, Alamo; Louisville, Kentucky, Keeneland race track; Chicago, Illinois (cityscape and Shriners); Spokane, Washington; Western states trip (Omaha, Nebraska; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Badlands, South Dakota; Cedar Pass Lodge; Mount Rushmore; Yellowstone National Park; Salt Creek Falls, Oregon; Crater Lake Park, Oregon; California Redwoods, San Francisco, Yosemite, Los Angeles/Glendale, Hollywood Bowl, UCLA; Reno, Nevada; Hoover Dam; Grand Canyon; Petrified Forest and trading post; Salt Lake City, copper pit, Great Salt Lake, Reno; Cliff House (San Francisco); Disneyland); and the Northeastern United States and Canada, including the border crossing, and the White Mountains cog railway in New Hampshire.

The collection consists of home movies from Brice Nelson. Highlights include travel footage from Europe in 1956 (Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Vienna, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Heidelberg, the Rhine River), Washington D.C., Mount Vernon and the Rock of Gibraltar. There is also footage of birthday and Christmas celebrations.

The collection consists of home movies of the Cearley family. Included are scenes of Georgia, California, Idaho, Dallas, Galveston, Fort Worth, Hawaii, Okinawa, and Oklahoma.

One film from the Kraft World Wide Marketing Meeting, McCormick Place, Chicago, 1965.

The collection consists of family home scenes in Alabama in the early- to mid-1960s including baby bath time, Christmas, snow scenes, a cemetery visit, a highway trip to Chattanooga (gasoline selling at 27 cents/gallon), the Smokey Mountains, a small zoo, downtown Scottsboro, AL; a winter ice storm; the Sam Houston historic schoolhouse in Maryville, Tennessee; and a trip to Jamaica.

Recordings of church services and choral and gospel music. Many recordings occurred at historically black colleges and universities (HCBUs) and African American churches. 

The collection consists of footage taken from a trip to Barcelona and Costa Brava, Spain, and other family footage taken in Macon, Georgia upon their return from the trip. Much of the footage of Spain is of Bernard's daughters and includes their first communions and various birthday parties. Also included are shots of street festivals, a Palm Sunday festival, and northern Spain (including Viella and the border of France).

The collection consists of home movies from David Mitchell's family. Scenes include Easter celebrations; footage of Dellinger, Georgia; footage of Daytona and Fort Myers, Florida; and footage of Alabama.

Includes lectures by and interviews of Don Carter, Life in China recordings, Carolyn Carter interviewing Olive Anne Burns, and recordings labeled William Alton Carter (Billy Carter).

The collection consists of sound recordings of Elmo Ellis editorials.

The collection consists of home movies of Nell Epps and her family, dating from 1938-1970. There is footage of a pool and a garden, as well as some footage of Athens, Georgia.

The Ethridge home movies depict life on Southern farm land which was originally settled in 1799 and is now known as the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. The films specifically document the mid-20th century (since 1939), showing Georgia farm life, and the family and Southern travels of Ira Lanis Ethridge.

The collection consists of home movies from the Foley family. Also included are two commercially-produced reels of Kodak: 1.) "Cinegraph Eight: Midnight on a Pullman," no. 84550 available from Dec. 1932 to Dec. 1943, being an excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "In New York," and, 2.) "Always in Trouble," no. 84546 available from September 1932 and discontinued in December 1943. Excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "It's a Bear." In addition, there is one commercially-produced audio testing reel, "Norelco 101 Demonstration Tape 1-7/8 two track battery operated transistor tape recorder," with seven songs on each side.

For 35 years, Foxfire has been collecting history of the Southern Appalachian region, its people, and their ways of life. Starting with the publication of the first issue of The Foxfire Magazine in March 1967, Foxfire students have collected over 2,500 hours of taped interviews, more than 80,000 black and white negatives and photos, over 10,000 color slides, and 1,100 videotaped interviews with the elders of the Appalachian region. A unique feature of the audiotaped, videotaped, and photographic collections is that the information was collected by high school students, transcribed for the most part by hand, and published in The Foxfire Magazine and book series. The archives include a large amount of data never published.

Footage of two dances and art department activities.

The collection consists of home movies of Frank Sheffield of Americus, Georgia and his family, recorded over a period of forty years, from 1925-1965. Highlights include footage of England in the 1930s (Trafalgar Square, opening of Parliament, street scenes, the Thames, Whipsnade Zoo, Queen Mary in the historic royal coach); the Harrold-Sheffield wedding; the Sheffields' honeymoon at Lakemont; a dinner party thrown by the Sheffields in 1932; the Sheffield and Harrold family servants; Lindbergh's transatlantic flight; scenes of Americus, Georgia; New Orleans in the 1940s; pyramids in Yucatan, Cuervavaca and Taxco; a Southern Field Flying Jennie airshow from the 1960s; and a trip to Cape Cod.

The collection consists of John Newman's home movies, including a reel of construction sites of buildings built by his father's construction business, Newman Construction Company; Newman Construction Company's projects in 1937, 1938 and 1939 (including several Public Works Administration projects); and one short reel of John F. Kennedy's appearance at the La Grange, Georgia, airport in October 1960. Other scenes from Newman's home movies include children's birthdays, holidays, a wedding (with footage of the bride preparing for the ceremony and the table of gifts), Panama City (Florida), Christmas, and school pageants, as well as other scenes around LaGrange, Georgia. The films were shot by John R. Newman (father of Fred Newman) and Claire Newman.

The collection consists of home movies of Fred Ware's life, dating from the 1930s to the 1960s. Included is footage of Fred as a baby; the family dog; trips to London, Florida, Tallulah Gorge, Dallas, various locations in Europe, and Jamaica; camping and fishing excursions; and Fred's first car.

The collection consists of footage of a deer herd health evaluation in Clinch and Echols counties, Georgia, January 10-13, 1966. In the footage, 12 white-tail deer (ten adults and two fawns) were collected and necropsied. Later scenes were filmed at the UGA Vet School.

The collection consists of six reels of home movies showing an outdoor baseball game, a train yard and railroad crew, children playing, beach scenes in Florida, cleanup of a train wreck, and outdoor snow scenes.
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