482 collections


The Ethridge home movies depict life on Southern farm land which was originally settled in 1799 and is now known as the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. The films specifically document the mid-20th century (since 1939), showing Georgia farm life, and the family and Southern travels of Ira Lanis Ethridge.

Major Gibson’s black and white and color home movies span 1942 through 1954 and document family life in base housing, time off with several groups of friends, the interior of base offices, bomber aircraft, and a parade in Butler, Georgia. Particularly of interest is footage of the Gibsons’ son, Bill, as an infant in what is a very typical family home movie scene - walking and crawling on the lawn outside the home with his mother, Wilma. What was a rather ordinary scene becomes more interesting when Mrs. Gibson holds up in front of young Bill a sign reading "14 August 1945 V-J Day Today."

The collection consists of home movies of Geneva Grant's family. Included is footage of Macon, Georgia; a wedding; the family's home; Christmas; Hollywood Beach and Miami, Florida; and Six Flags Over Georgia shortly after it opened.

The collection consists of home movies from the Hammond family. Included are scenes from World War II, home life, Christmas, a farm and a lake.

The collection consists of Louis C. Harris, Sr.'s entire home movie collection (1942-1960) of silent, black-and-white and color, camera-original, 8mm and 16mm home movie footage shot between 1942 and 1960 in Italy; Algiers; Augusta, Georgia; Florida; South Carolina; and Yucca Flat, Nevada; and three commercial 16mm films. The National Film Preservation Foundation generously funded full film preservation of several reels of Mr. Harris's home movies. Three reels of Kodachrome document a July, 8 1953 soap box derby sponsored by the Augusta Chronicle. But three months before this innocent American pastime, Mr. Harris was invited by the government, as a member of the press, to witness a 16-kiloton atomic blast at Yucca Flat, Nevada, on March 17, 1953. He made a short Kodachrome 16mm film of his trip west which includes scenes at the Phoenix, Arizona airport; day and evening shots of the Las Vegas Strip including the famous "Vegas Vic" waving cowboy neon sign erected in 1951 (the Pioneer Club casino which it advertised closed in 1995); at Indian Springs AFB where atomic bomb drop planes were being "decontaminated" with water and brooms after blast flyovers; at the test location with other journalists being briefed; the atomic blast itself; and colleagues present just after the test. His newspaper accounts of the events that week (available on microfilm in the UGA Main Library) describe the safety of the test and the need for Americans to prepare for potential nuclear war. The family's papers and Mr. Harris's home audio disc recordings are also at UGA.

The collection consists of Harlan family home movies featuring a California vacation, a new baby, Christmas celebrations, New York City, Philadelphia, New Jersey, Washington (D.C.), a prom, and a graduation.

The collection consists of footage shot in various locations, including Orangeburg and Edisto Beach, South Carolina (c. 1946/1947); Iran and Portugal (1964); and Berlin, Prague and Portofino (1965). There is also footage of marlin fishing in Mexico in June, 1965. Included is a purchased black-and-white film about Florida water park acts entitled "Aqua Frolics."

The collection consists of home movies from the family of Dr. Gail Jackson. Included is footage of a 1947 road trip on Route 66 West from Joplin, Missouri to Flagstaff, Arizona, the Grand Canyon, Utah and Colorado, and other locations; a 1948 trip through the Tetons, Yellowstone, Cheyenne, etc, and a dude ranch; a Castle Heights graduation featuring Bernarr MacFadden; an Officer Candidate School graduation in Newport, Rhode Island; and miscellaneous events in the family's life, such as scenes of the farm and home, snow in Vincennes, and a birthday party for Frederic L. Jackson.

The Kaliska-Greenblatt Home Movie Collection is the most locally significant film footage in the home movie collections of the Walter J. Brown Media Archives. The films were taken by William Kaliska and his friend Sidney Greenblatt of Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. Kaliska's films date from the late 1920s to the mid-1930s and show the enthusiasm he had for taking film footage of the varied events he was involved with as a marketing manager for Coca-Cola. The films include the earliest known films of the UGA campus, being scenes at Harold Hirsch Hall (Law School), around the time of its dedication in 1932. Prominent in the group of people in that shot is Coca-Cola's then Vice President in Charge of Sales, Harrison Jones (UGA Class of 1900), later president of the company. This same reel contains the only known footage of Moses Michael, longtime Athens resident. His wife Emma appears with Jean Kaliska in the footage, and the young couple in the segment are the Michaels' son and daughter-in-law, David and Sarah Hall Michael and their children, at their house on Milledge, next to the Phi Epsilon House. Mr. Kaliska filmed carving work on Stone Mountain in 1929, and several university sporting events: a regional track meet at Georgia Tech's campus which includes Olympian Ed Hamm, and the UGA vs. Tech football game in Athens in 1929. He was also in Athens in Sanford Stadium for the UGA v. Tech baseball game and Senior Parade of 1929. Mr. Kaliska also filmed Tech football player Stumpy Thomason and the bear "Bruin" who is shown drinking a Coca-Cola. In July 1930, he was filming from a window of a building along Peachtree Street in Atlanta to capture parts of the July 1930 tickertape parade for Bobby Jones's Grand Slam. The reels also include a trip to Miami that Harold Hirsch took with family and friends. They stayed at one of Miami Beach's most prestigious hotels, the Roney Plaza Hotel. Aside from this and other archival footage, the original Roney Plaza exists only in old photographs and postcards. Hirsch's daughter, Ernestine, and cousin Jake's wife Marjorie and her son Jack are shown sunning at the hotel beachfront. During the trip, Hirsch's group cruised Biscayne Bay, and there are views of many long-gone Miami beachfront buildings, an alligator and an ostrich farm, Seminole Indians, and other cruise ships and lines which regularly traveled to Cuba. Mr. and Mrs. Kaliska were dog fanciers and owned schnauzers. A brief segment of the footage includes Beno Stein, a dog trainer in Atlanta, likely connected with the Atlanta Kennel Club, putting several dogs through a routine around a training obstacle course. One of the reels is of a garden party at the Atlanta mansion of Robert and Nell Woodruff (Coca-Cola magnate and his Athens-born wife) for the wife of a California Coca-Cola executive who was visiting Atlanta. Another depicts a day of fun at the Brookhaven Country Club in 1939 - pitching horseshoes, swimming, golfing, and several people drinking Coca-Cola. There is also footage of a ride in the Goodyear blimp "Defender" from Atlanta Airport around 1930; the footage was used in a 2007 Georgia Public Broadcasting documentary, The South Takes Flight: 100 Years of Aviation in Georgia. The Kaliskas and friends filmed a vacation to the Cumberland Gap area and Nashville, including President Polk's grave, and Kentucky. There are summer camp scenes shot at Camp Victor, connected to the Atlanta Hebrew Orphans Home. There is also footage of the family of prominent Atlanta businessman Victor H. Kriegshaber at their home.

The collection consists of home movies from the McNeel family. Highlights include footage of McNeel Marble Company, a large builder of monuments located in Marietta, Georgia.

The Rayburn Moore collection consists of footage related to the Moore family. Also included are two reels of film showing touring performances of KFFA Radio's "King Biscuit Time," and one reel showing a walking tour around Ralston Purina's Research Farm outside of St. Louis, Missouri. One of the King Biscuit Time reels is a circa 1943 country store performance by blues artists Sonny Boy Williamson and Robert Junior Lockwood. The second King Biscuit Time reel is a 1952 bus performing tour of various Arkansas locations by Sonny Boy Williamson and other African-American performers.

Home movies of Morgan County High School (Madison, Georgia) football games. The films cover a period from 1955-1967, when Bill Corry was the football coach.

The collection consists of John Newman's home movies, including a reel of construction sites of buildings built by his father's construction business, Newman Construction Company; Newman Construction Company's projects in 1937, 1938 and 1939 (including several Public Works Administration projects); and one short reel of John F. Kennedy's appearance at the La Grange, Georgia, airport in October 1960. Other scenes from Newman's home movies include children's birthdays, holidays, a wedding (with footage of the bride preparing for the ceremony and the table of gifts), Panama City (Florida), Christmas, and school pageants, as well as other scenes around LaGrange, Georgia. The films were shot by John R. Newman (father of Fred Newman) and Claire Newman.

The collection consists of home movies from William Oddy, filmed from the 1920s to the 1940s. Locations depicted include Michigan; Ontario; Lake Louise; Banff, Alberta; Alaska; Georgian Bay; and a trip through the southern United States.

The collection consists of one reel of Super8mm film that captures the UGA campus in 1968 and in particular a campus demonstration called "Persecution City" in North Campus. The footage also features sculpture on display in North Campus.

The collection consists of six reels of home movies showing an outdoor baseball game, a train yard and railroad crew, children playing, beach scenes in Florida, cleanup of a train wreck, and outdoor snow scenes.

The collection consists of home movies from the Powell family, including footage of their home, the outdoors, children playing, camping trips to Roosevelt State Park, Buffalo Camp in Blairsville, Pine Mountain, Dublin and Davis Lake, putting together a pop-up camper, swimming and boating lakeside, a hospital, flowers, skydiving, dogs, kittens playing, and winter snow at the family home. Also included is travel footage of locations such as Murphy, North Carolina, where they viewed the "world's largest ten commandments;" Cypress Gardens in Florida; Looking Glass Falls; Pisgah National Forest; Busch Gardens in Florida; Grandview Overlook; New River Gorge National Park; and Grandfather Mountain Mile High Swinging Bridge.

The collection consists of home movies from the family of Mary and Philip Ready. There are typical family scenes of birthday parties, holidays, and childrens' dance recitals, but the Ready home movies focus on travel, including footage of New York State, New York City, the World's Fair in British Columbia and Montreal, Niagara Falls, New Jersey, Washington (D.C.), Arlington Cemetary, the Grand Canyon, California, Las Vegas, Yellowstone National Park, and Hawaii.

The collection consists of home movies from the Reap family of Tampa, Florida. Notable places and events covered include Nantahala Forest, ruby mining in Franklin (N.C.), Charleston (Miss.), and the annual celebration of the Gasparilla Invasion in Tampa, Florida. Other films include footage of birthday parties, weddings, and holidays.

The collection consists of home movies from the Rossiter family of Savannah, Georgia. There is footage of a St. Patrick's Day parade in Savannah, as well as movies of the family having a picnic and playing on the beach. Also included is footage of travel in Europe; locations include Luzern, Paris, East Berlin, West Berlin, Venice, Travis Field, Ireland and England.

The collection consists of home movies of Frank Sheffield of Americus, Georgia and his family, recorded over a period of forty years, from 1925-1965. Highlights include footage of England in the 1930s (Trafalgar Square, opening of Parliament, street scenes, the Thames, Whipsnade Zoo, Queen Mary in the historic royal coach); the Harrold-Sheffield wedding; the Sheffields' honeymoon at Lakemont; a dinner party thrown by the Sheffields in 1932; the Sheffield and Harrold family servants; Lindbergh's transatlantic flight; scenes of Americus, Georgia; New Orleans in the 1940s; pyramids in Yucatan, Cuervavaca and Taxco; a Southern Field Flying Jennie airshow from the 1960s; and a trip to Cape Cod.

The collection consists of home movies from the Sparks family, including Jackson Gillen Sparks, Rosa Gillen Sparks, Francis Linton Sparks, Sr., Maybell Sparks and Francis Linton Sparks, Jr. The movies were shot in Warrenton, Georgia; at the Citadel in South Carolina; and in Florida. Included is footage of Warrenton homes, gardens and residents; a family vacation to Marineland, Florida; swimming in the family pool; a 1938 "Kiddie Parade"; and the site of a February 1938 plane crash near Warrenton that killed a US Department of Labor mediator en route to Puerto Rico. The movies were at least partially filmed by Francis Linton Sparks, Sr.

The collection consists of home movies of Nancy Stephens and her family, dating from circa 1929-1960. Some films document Stephens College, which Nancy attended. There is also early footage (1929, 1930) of several men golfing. Otherwise, the footage consists primarily of family members and friends at birthday parties, Christmas, weddings; children playing outdoors, family pets; travel to Louisiana, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Washington (D.C.), Portland (Oregon), Colorado Springs, Canada, Kansas City and Plattsburg (Missouri).
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