84 collections

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The collection consists of home movies of Nancy Stephens and her family, dating from circa 1929-1960. Some films document Stephens College, which Nancy attended. There is also early footage (1929, 1930) of several men golfing. Otherwise, the footage consists primarily of family members and friends at birthday parties, Christmas, weddings; children playing outdoors, family pets; travel to Louisiana, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Washington (D.C.), Portland (Oregon), Colorado Springs, Canada, Kansas City and Plattsburg (Missouri).

The collection consists of 16mm black-and-white and color home movies filmed in and around Butler, Ga. at Suggs Machine Shop. Among the scenes included are people working at the shop, footage of a skidder (a piece of equipment used in logging), an icy day in Butler during Christmas 1943, many of Suggs' family members, various farm scenes (including flowering fruit trees, a chicken house, collecting of chicken eggs and a brooder house), and the airport at Columbus, Georgia.

The Turnbull Family Home Movie Collection is comprised of eleven 16mm color and black and white films taken between 1947 and 1957 by Samuel J. Turnbull. Mr. Turnbull was in the United States Army and took footage of Fort Dix, New Jersey in 1947 as well as Germany, Switzerland, France, Italy (1953), Belgium (1952), England (1952), Scotland (1952), and Japan (1957). Also included are shots of family vacations in Indiana and at Yellowstone National Park (1957) as well as family Christmas celebrations in 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, and 1954.

The collection consists of Williams family home movies shot between 1942 and 1960. They show typical family scenes, such as holiday celebrations, childrens' birthday parties, a wedding, trips to the beach, winter ice storms, picnics, a family reunion, and several shots of downtown Monroe, as well as a Monroe church and Sunday school letting out. Of local interest are 1948 scenes of a demonstration farm in Winder, Georgia, and the turkeys and cows of the Williams' family farm. Grant Park in Atlanta and its zoo are also featured several times. Both a Girl Scout camp and a Boy Scout camp are shown. Also, the earlier films taken during WWII show a captured Japanese submarine touring through Monroe. A 1943 Victory Parade includes children promoting scrap drives, victory gardening, an air raid group, and representations of the Four Freedoms. A recruiting drive in downtown Monroe features a damaged Luftwaffe warbird, and a dirigible patrols the shoreline while the family is at the beach. The bulk of the films are travel scenes by the family and also of Booth Williams at national conventions in Florida and Wichita. A 1949 trip from Georgia to the Western U.S. begins on U.S. Highway 41 and documents a portion of Peacock Alley - a country store selling chenille bedspreads, aprons, and bathrobes. Travels include: Stone Mountain, Georgia (view from top); Vogel State Park in north Georgia; the old market at Louisville, Georgia; Lookout Mountain, Georgia, and Point Park; Gatlinburg, Tennessee and Cherokee, North Carolina; Asheville, North Carolina, including a view of the Grove Park Inn; Edisto Beach, South Carolina; Florida: St. Augustine, Crystal River, Cypress Gardens, Gainesville, New Orleans, orange groves/packing houses; Texas: Houston, King Ranch cattle, San Antonio, Alamo; Louisville, Kentucky, Keeneland race track; Chicago, Illinois (cityscape and Shriners); Spokane, Washington; Western states trip (Omaha, Nebraska; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Badlands, South Dakota; Cedar Pass Lodge; Mount Rushmore; Yellowstone National Park; Salt Creek Falls, Oregon; Crater Lake Park, Oregon; California Redwoods, San Francisco, Yosemite, Los Angeles/Glendale, Hollywood Bowl, UCLA; Reno, Nevada; Hoover Dam; Grand Canyon; Petrified Forest and trading post; Salt Lake City, copper pit, Great Salt Lake, Reno; Cliff House (San Francisco); Disneyland); and the Northeastern United States and Canada, including the border crossing, and the White Mountains cog railway in New Hampshire.

Consists of over 5 million feet of newsfilm from WSB-TV, Atlanta, Georgia dating from 1948-1981. Contains edited and raw footage. No televised newscasts are included.

The collection consists of home movies from Sanford Head and his family and friends. The footage mostly consists of travel footage; there are shots of West Virginia, England, Scotland, Paris and Burma, among other places. There is also footage of various family members and friends, and summer activities such as waterskiing and swimming.

The collection consists of 50 years of radio, television and film productions, papers, and photographs documenting the founding and growth of Protestant Radio and Television Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies of Fred Ware's life, dating from the 1930s to the 1960s. Included is footage of Fred as a baby; the family dog; trips to London, Florida, Tallulah Gorge, Dallas, various locations in Europe, and Jamaica; camping and fishing excursions; and Fred's first car.

The collection consists of over 500 film reels from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Topics covered include parks and historic sites (e.g. Tallulah Falls, Fort McAllister), hunting, fish (especially trout), birds (woodpeckers, eagles, etc), wildlife (e.g. white-tailed deer), various locations around Georgia (Atlanta, Sapelo Island, etc) and incidents in Georgia history. The collection spans the 1970s through the 1990s, but is not a complete archive of all the unit's output. Also included is film footage collected by the department, dating to the 1950s.

The collection consists of home movies of Nell Epps and her family, dating from 1938-1970. There is footage of a pool and a garden, as well as some footage of Athens, Georgia.

This collection is made up of several different groups of film and videotape which have come to the Media Archives since 1995. As with many collections, not everything produced by the Georgia Center is in the Media Archives, but we hold a broad representation of their material. The Georgia Center and the UGA Art Department at one time maintained a storage building where a once-circulating collection of educational and industrial films were stored. Those films eventually came to the Libraries' Media Archives and have been called the Georgia Center Film Collection. When the Media Archives was established in 1995, those films were brought here. Some of the films date back to the 1930s, though it is likely that these are later reprinted copies of earlier-produced films. The earliest known 2" videotape of a Georgia Center production that we hold was donated to us by Patrick Shields, "A Day with Jimmie Driftwood" which we believe dates to the early 1960s. In 2004, we received the bulk of the Georgia Center's taped programs consisting of tapes of educational programs on campus, continuing education programs, and original productions. A broad range of subjects is covered, including famous Georgians (Dean Rusk, Lamar Dodd, et al.), educational materials, and significant events at the University, among many others.

The collection consists of home movies from Rob Winthrop's family. The films include footage of Groton Plantation during various hunts; bird hunts at the plantation; trips to England, Venice, Germany, Paris, and a yachting trip to Bermuda; an airshow; a hunting trip to the mountains of Mexico, including urban scenes, small village scenes, and pyramids; the family in New York City, interiors and exteriors around the city; theater district Fort Ethan Allen in Vermont; a 1933 visit to Santa Barbara; a sea voyage on the Empress of Britain going to England in 1933, and a wedding there; several London scenes including changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace; Croydon Airport 1934 and a Handley Page airplane; sculling at Henley in 1935; dogs, deer, horses, outdoor scenes, bird hunting, riding lessons, polo games; the 1947 Cheyenne Bots Sots parade; 1951 horse trials/competition and other horse shows; a christening; 1950s rowing competitions; and a safari trip to Africa in 1970.

The collection consists of home movies from the Foley family. Also included are two commercially-produced reels of Kodak: 1.) "Cinegraph Eight: Midnight on a Pullman," no. 84550 available from Dec. 1932 to Dec. 1943, being an excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "In New York," and, 2.) "Always in Trouble," no. 84546 available from September 1932 and discontinued in December 1943. Excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "It's a Bear." In addition, there is one commercially-produced audio testing reel, "Norelco 101 Demonstration Tape 1-7/8 two track battery operated transistor tape recorder," with seven songs on each side.

The collection consists of home movies from the Ware family reunions over a period of approximately 30 years. The footage features family members appearing in front of the camera so that their names could be recorded.

The collection consists of home movies from the Jensen and Trap families. The movies consist mostly of trip footage, including film of California, the Dells, and Seattle. Other events include birthdays and a parade.

The collection consists of hundreds of hours of footage from Parade of Quartets, a gospel program aired on WJBF-TV in Augusta, Georgia. This collection documents decades of regional gospel music performances, religious practices, and political activities, and represents possibly the largest collection of gospel performance footage at any North American library. The collection is a rare example of a sustained African American media presence on a southern television affiliate.

The collection consists of one DVD-R containing over 60 hours of audio files of "Monitor" programs dating between 1955 and 1975. Prominent guests include Wilt Chamberlain, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, and Marlene Dietrich. The collection is for study purposes only.

The collection consists of radio transcription discs of recordings by Eddie Cannon and His Radio Playboys (featuring Ruby Lee Yopp Havis), originally aired on WBML Radio in Macon, Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies from Brice Nelson. Highlights include travel footage from Europe in 1956 (Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Vienna, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Heidelberg, the Rhine River), Washington D.C., Mount Vernon and the Rock of Gibraltar. There is also footage of birthday and Christmas celebrations.

Interviews of Coburn by Victor Rosen from November 1955-April 1956.

One reel (c. 1955) shows someone plowing a sandy field. The other is also of plowing, but appears to be double exposed or that the film jumped in the camera.

Includes lectures and interviews by Dodd, J. J. Sweeney lectures, SREB Seminar on the Arts, Carl Holty, plus recordings related to Apollo 17 and the human heart.

The Ray Moore Film Collection consists of interviews with Ty Cobb, Dr. Martin Luther King, Bobby Jones, Senator John McClellan and Robert Frost, documentaries I Walked Today and Center of Creation, an Olympic marketing video made for the IOC meeting in Puerto Rico, broadcast segments, and more.

Films documenting travel to Mexico, Barbados, Nassau, England, and home.

Home movies, professional films, outtakes, audio formats, and videotapes made by "Doc" Tommy Scott during his long career as a musician and traveling medicine show man.
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