66 collections

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"Pathe Baby was the trade name for a 9.5 mm home movie system introduced in France for Christmas 1922. An extensive catalog of existing Pathe Freres films were issued in this new format. The first were only 30 feet long -- about 90 seconds of cranking. But the innovative freeze frame mechanism lengthened the showing time by not wasting footage on title cards. In 1924, film length was increased to 60 feet. In 1928, Super reel films that were 300 feet long were introduced. 9.5 mm persisted as the 'standard' format in Europe thru the 1950's. Pathex was the trade name of Pathe Exchange, Inc., Pathe's US subsidiary. In America, film exchanges distributed movie releases to theaters. The 9.5 mm format was introduced in America for Christmas of 1925 (Model D projectors)."--pathex.com

The collection consists of Louis C. Harris, Sr.'s entire home movie collection (1942-1960) of silent, black-and-white and color, camera-original, 8mm and 16mm home movie footage shot between 1942 and 1960 in Italy; Algiers; Augusta, Georgia; Florida; South Carolina; and Yucca Flat, Nevada; and three commercial 16mm films. The National Film Preservation Foundation generously funded full film preservation of several reels of Mr. Harris's home movies. Three reels of Kodachrome document a July, 8 1953 soap box derby sponsored by the Augusta Chronicle. But three months before this innocent American pastime, Mr. Harris was invited by the government, as a member of the press, to witness a 16-kiloton atomic blast at Yucca Flat, Nevada, on March 17, 1953. He made a short Kodachrome 16mm film of his trip west which includes scenes at the Phoenix, Arizona airport; day and evening shots of the Las Vegas Strip including the famous "Vegas Vic" waving cowboy neon sign erected in 1951 (the Pioneer Club casino which it advertised closed in 1995); at Indian Springs AFB where atomic bomb drop planes were being "decontaminated" with water and brooms after blast flyovers; at the test location with other journalists being briefed; the atomic blast itself; and colleagues present just after the test. His newspaper accounts of the events that week (available on microfilm in the UGA Main Library) describe the safety of the test and the need for Americans to prepare for potential nuclear war. The family's papers and Mr. Harris's home audio disc recordings are also at UGA.

The collection consists of home movies from the McNeel family. Highlights include footage of McNeel Marble Company, a large builder of monuments located in Marietta, Georgia.

An extensive number of videotapes and DVDs, focusing on reunions, the 94th Division's overseas campaigns, and veterans.

The collection consists of home movies of Nancy Stephens and her family, dating from circa 1929-1960. Some films document Stephens College, which Nancy attended. There is also early footage (1929, 1930) of several men golfing. Otherwise, the footage consists primarily of family members and friends at birthday parties, Christmas, weddings; children playing outdoors, family pets; travel to Louisiana, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Washington (D.C.), Portland (Oregon), Colorado Springs, Canada, Kansas City and Plattsburg (Missouri).

133 reels of film containing home movies from the Patel, Broaddus, Cofer, and Halloran families

The collection consists of 50 years of radio, television and film productions, papers, and photographs documenting the founding and growth of Protestant Radio and Television Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

Home movies, professional films, outtakes, audio formats, and videotapes made by "Doc" Tommy Scott during his long career as a musician and traveling medicine show man.

The Rayburn Moore collection consists of footage related to the Moore family. Also included are two reels of film showing touring performances of KFFA Radio's "King Biscuit Time," and one reel showing a walking tour around Ralston Purina's Research Farm outside of St. Louis, Missouri. One of the King Biscuit Time reels is a circa 1943 country store performance by blues artists Sonny Boy Williamson and Robert Junior Lockwood. The second King Biscuit Time reel is a 1952 bus performing tour of various Arkansas locations by Sonny Boy Williamson and other African-American performers.

The collection consists of home movies from Sanford Head and his family and friends. The footage mostly consists of travel footage; there are shots of West Virginia, England, Scotland, Paris and Burma, among other places. There is also footage of various family members and friends, and summer activities such as waterskiing and swimming.

The collection consists of home movies from the Sparks family, including Jackson Gillen Sparks, Rosa Gillen Sparks, Francis Linton Sparks, Sr., Maybell Sparks and Francis Linton Sparks, Jr. The movies were shot in Warrenton, Georgia; at the Citadel in South Carolina; and in Florida. Included is footage of Warrenton homes, gardens and residents; a family vacation to Marineland, Florida; swimming in the family pool; a 1938 "Kiddie Parade"; and the site of a February 1938 plane crash near Warrenton that killed a US Department of Labor mediator en route to Puerto Rico. The movies were at least partially filmed by Francis Linton Sparks, Sr.

The collection consists of an "Our Hometown" type of town film, made in 1947 by Sol Landsman and Arthur Loevin. The film depicts the people and businesses of Swainsboro, Georgia.

The Turnbull Family Home Movie Collection is comprised of eleven 16mm color and black and white films taken between 1947 and 1957 by Samuel J. Turnbull. Mr. Turnbull was in the United States Army and took footage of Fort Dix, New Jersey in 1947 as well as Germany, Switzerland, France, Italy (1953), Belgium (1952), England (1952), Scotland (1952), and Japan (1957). Also included are shots of family vacations in Indiana and at Yellowstone National Park (1957) as well as family Christmas celebrations in 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, and 1954.

The collection consists of 1368 radio transcription discs from several UCLA collections. Titles in this collection include: Al Clauser and His Oklahoma Outlaws; The Ballet; Bing Crosby; Carnation Bouquet; Carnation Contented Hour (extensive run); Carnation Family Party; Casey, Crime Photographer; Chuck Wagon Group; Father Knows Best (extensive run); Flynn and Quinn; Good News of 1939; Hallmark Playhouse; Heartbeat Theatre (extensive run); I Can't Leave Her Behind; Labor Arbitration; Lone Journey; Louella Parsons Show; Mystery Is My Hobby (extensive run); NBC Symphony; National Farm and Home Hour; Oklahoma Roundup; President Truman speech; "Red" Carnation Gives a Weekend Party; Rising Tide; Scientific Dissertation; Sons of the Pioneers Show (extensive run); Stars Over Hollywood; Suspense; This Is Your FBI (extensive run); Uncle Tom's Cabin; We're Very Fussy On the Radio/How to Break Into Radio; What's Doin' Ladies.

The collection consists of 16mm black-and-white and color home movies filmed in and around Butler, Ga. at Suggs Machine Shop. Among the scenes included are people working at the shop, footage of a skidder (a piece of equipment used in logging), an icy day in Butler during Christmas 1943, many of Suggs' family members, various farm scenes (including flowering fruit trees, a chicken house, collecting of chicken eggs and a brooder house), and the airport at Columbus, Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies from the Ware family reunions over a period of approximately 30 years. The footage features family members appearing in front of the camera so that their names could be recorded.

The collection consists of radio transcription discs of recordings by Eddie Cannon and His Radio Playboys (featuring Ruby Lee Yopp Havis), originally aired on WBML Radio in Macon, Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies from William Oddy, filmed from the 1920s to the 1940s. Locations depicted include Michigan; Ontario; Lake Louise; Banff, Alberta; Alaska; Georgian Bay; and a trip through the southern United States.

Five films that highlight Dr. James' dog and opossum behavioral research.

The collection consists of home movies from Rob Winthrop's family. The films include footage of Groton Plantation during various hunts; bird hunts at the plantation; trips to England, Venice, Germany, Paris, and a yachting trip to Bermuda; an airshow; a hunting trip to the mountains of Mexico, including urban scenes, small village scenes, and pyramids; the family in New York City, interiors and exteriors around the city; theater district Fort Ethan Allen in Vermont; a 1933 visit to Santa Barbara; a sea voyage on the Empress of Britain going to England in 1933, and a wedding there; several London scenes including changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace; Croydon Airport 1934 and a Handley Page airplane; sculling at Henley in 1935; dogs, deer, horses, outdoor scenes, bird hunting, riding lessons, polo games; the 1947 Cheyenne Bots Sots parade; 1951 horse trials/competition and other horse shows; a christening; 1950s rowing competitions; and a safari trip to Africa in 1970.

Consists of over 5 million feet of newsfilm from WSB-TV, Atlanta, Georgia dating from 1948-1981. Contains edited and raw footage. No televised newscasts are included.
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