99 collections

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The collection consists of home movies of Geneva Grant's family. Included is footage of Macon, Georgia; a wedding; the family's home; Christmas; Hollywood Beach and Miami, Florida; and Six Flags Over Georgia shortly after it opened.

This collection is made up of several different groups of film and videotape which have come to the Media Archives since 1995. As with many collections, not everything produced by the Georgia Center is in the Media Archives, but we hold a broad representation of their material. The Georgia Center and the UGA Art Department at one time maintained a storage building where a once-circulating collection of educational and industrial films were stored. Those films eventually came to the Libraries' Media Archives and have been called the Georgia Center Film Collection. When the Media Archives was established in 1995, those films were brought here. Some of the films date back to the 1930s, though it is likely that these are later reprinted copies of earlier-produced films. The earliest known 2" videotape of a Georgia Center production that we hold was donated to us by Patrick Shields, "A Day with Jimmie Driftwood" which we believe dates to the early 1960s. In 2004, we received the bulk of the Georgia Center's taped programs consisting of tapes of educational programs on campus, continuing education programs, and original productions. A broad range of subjects is covered, including famous Georgians (Dean Rusk, Lamar Dodd, et al.), educational materials, and significant events at the University, among many others.

The collection consists of over 500 film reels from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Topics covered include parks and historic sites (e.g. Tallulah Falls, Fort McAllister), hunting, fish (especially trout), birds (woodpeckers, eagles, etc), wildlife (e.g. white-tailed deer), various locations around Georgia (Atlanta, Sapelo Island, etc) and incidents in Georgia history. The collection spans the 1970s through the 1990s, but is not a complete archive of all the unit's output. Also included is film footage collected by the department, dating to the 1950s.

Audio field recordings made in coastal and North Georgia by Art Rosenbaum, primarily between 1976 and 1983, with one each from 1955 and 1966. Musicians were recorded in their homes and churches. Some oral histories are included along with performances. Genres represented include old-time string band music, gospel, ballads, blues, work songs, shout songs, banjo picking, and religious singing. Performers include the McIntosh County Shouters, Howard Finster, Neal Pattman, Gordon Tanner, Joe Rakestraw, Jake Staggers, the Eller Brothers with Ross Brown, Doc and Lucy Barnes, and W. Guy Bruce.

Includes recordings of various builds and programs, Habitat news coverage and interviews, Global Village, Jimmy Carter Work Project, Millard and Linda Fuller, Shelter of God's Love, and Chautauqua Series.
 

The collection consists of home movies from the Hammond family. Included are scenes from World War II, home life, Christmas, a farm and a lake.

The collection consists of footage of Gordon and Macon (including downtown scenes), Georgia, and families based in Gordon. There are also some early home movies of a kaolin mine's operation that were transferred from their original 16mm to VHS in the 1980s ; the Walter J. Brown Media Archive does not have the original 16mm film. Also included is footage of numerous beach vacation trips in Georgia and Florida, mountain trips, picnics, a trip to England and Scotland, scenes of Central of Georgia railroad trains and stations, a mobile x-ray clinic for tuberculosis, family pets (cat and dog), birthday parties, Zoo Atlanta, Willie B. II gorilla, petting zoos, parades (including centennial of the Civil War parade and a Halloween parade), the Gordon mines, Rock Eagle, Warner Robbins, and miscellaneous family footage.

The collection consists of footage shot in various locations, including Orangeburg and Edisto Beach, South Carolina (c. 1946/1947); Iran and Portugal (1964); and Berlin, Prague and Portofino (1965). There is also footage of marlin fishing in Mexico in June, 1965. Included is a purchased black-and-white film about Florida water park acts entitled "Aqua Frolics."

The collection consists of home movies from the Alberts family. The footage is primarily family scenes involving James Alberts' young daughter, Jill, in the first three years of her life. One reel of footage was taken aboard the "Eastward E-7-68" marine research vessel. Other locations include New Hampshire and Natureland.

The collection consists of 21 films made by J. Aubrey Smith, donated by him in 2001, along with camera equipment he used and records he kept from his work (such as log books, maps to locations, notes on filming techniques, camera manuals, etc.). Smith's films were made for the Agricultural Extension Service. Some of them were sponsored by Rich's Department store. As sponsored films, they have a subtle or sometimes quite blatant message since the purpose of a sponsored film is to teach about or exhort the viewer to use a service or product. Since he was working for an agricultural entity, these films are primarily about improving agriculture, growing better crops, eliminating insects, and being efficient in the home and on the farm. During the post-World War II years as America was expanding economically, these films promoted the idea that a better life could be had through education, proper exploitation of local resources (such as the Agricultural Extension Service), more efficient use of home and farm equipment, all by tapping in to the improvements that had come from the war. The result would be an improvement of one's community by improving one's life, whether that be by using chemical pesticides, buying one's draperies at Rich's, joining a co-op, or learning new farming methods.

The collection consists of home movies from the Jensen and Trap families. The movies consist mostly of trip footage, including film of California, the Dells, and Seattle. Other events include birthdays and a parade.

Audio recording of talk by Dean Pound - Luncheon held in his honor at the Continuing Education Building

Audio recording of the presentation ceremony of John Marshall's quill pen to the University of Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies from the Rossiter family of Savannah, Georgia. There is footage of a St. Patrick's Day parade in Savannah, as well as movies of the family having a picnic and playing on the beach. Also included is footage of travel in Europe; locations include Luzern, Paris, East Berlin, West Berlin, Venice, Travis Field, Ireland and England.

Includes home movies, recordings from BBC, Egyptian broadcasts, and music.

Includes lectures and interviews by Dodd, J. J. Sweeney lectures, SREB Seminar on the Arts, Carl Holty, plus recordings related to Apollo 17 and the human heart.

6mm film, ¼" audiotape, and ¾" videotape of educational and unique items

"Pathe Baby was the trade name for a 9.5 mm home movie system introduced in France for Christmas 1922. An extensive catalog of existing Pathe Freres films were issued in this new format. The first were only 30 feet long -- about 90 seconds of cranking. But the innovative freeze frame mechanism lengthened the showing time by not wasting footage on title cards. In 1924, film length was increased to 60 feet. In 1928, Super reel films that were 300 feet long were introduced. 9.5 mm persisted as the 'standard' format in Europe thru the 1950's. Pathex was the trade name of Pathe Exchange, Inc., Pathe's US subsidiary. In America, film exchanges distributed movie releases to theaters. The 9.5 mm format was introduced in America for Christmas of 1925 (Model D projectors)."--pathex.com

The collection consists of Louis C. Harris, Sr.'s entire home movie collection (1942-1960) of silent, black-and-white and color, camera-original, 8mm and 16mm home movie footage shot between 1942 and 1960 in Italy; Algiers; Augusta, Georgia; Florida; South Carolina; and Yucca Flat, Nevada; and three commercial 16mm films. The National Film Preservation Foundation generously funded full film preservation of several reels of Mr. Harris's home movies. Three reels of Kodachrome document a July, 8 1953 soap box derby sponsored by the Augusta Chronicle. But three months before this innocent American pastime, Mr. Harris was invited by the government, as a member of the press, to witness a 16-kiloton atomic blast at Yucca Flat, Nevada, on March 17, 1953. He made a short Kodachrome 16mm film of his trip west which includes scenes at the Phoenix, Arizona airport; day and evening shots of the Las Vegas Strip including the famous "Vegas Vic" waving cowboy neon sign erected in 1951 (the Pioneer Club casino which it advertised closed in 1995); at Indian Springs AFB where atomic bomb drop planes were being "decontaminated" with water and brooms after blast flyovers; at the test location with other journalists being briefed; the atomic blast itself; and colleagues present just after the test. His newspaper accounts of the events that week (available on microfilm in the UGA Main Library) describe the safety of the test and the need for Americans to prepare for potential nuclear war. The family's papers and Mr. Harris's home audio disc recordings are also at UGA.

The collection consists of home movies from the family of Mary and Philip Ready. There are typical family scenes of birthday parties, holidays, and childrens' dance recitals, but the Ready home movies focus on travel, including footage of New York State, New York City, the World's Fair in British Columbia and Montreal, Niagara Falls, New Jersey, Washington (D.C.), Arlington Cemetary, the Grand Canyon, California, Las Vegas, Yellowstone National Park, and Hawaii.

An extensive number of videotapes and DVDs, focusing on reunions, the 94th Division's overseas campaigns, and veterans.

Moving image and sound recordings related to the personal and professional lives of Millard and Linda Fuller. Most of the materials pertain to the Fullers' work with Habitat for Humanity International, while a small portion of the collection relates to the Fuller Center for Housing and the Fullers' personal activities.

The collection consists of one DVD-R containing over 60 hours of audio files of "Monitor" programs dating between 1955 and 1975. Prominent guests include Wilt Chamberlain, Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, and Marlene Dietrich. The collection is for study purposes only.

Home movies of Morgan County High School (Madison, Georgia) football games. The films cover a period from 1955-1967, when Bill Corry was the football coach.

The collection consists of home movies of Nancy Stephens and her family, dating from circa 1929-1960. Some films document Stephens College, which Nancy attended. There is also early footage (1929, 1930) of several men golfing. Otherwise, the footage consists primarily of family members and friends at birthday parties, Christmas, weddings; children playing outdoors, family pets; travel to Louisiana, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Washington (D.C.), Portland (Oregon), Colorado Springs, Canada, Kansas City and Plattsburg (Missouri).

Includes recordings of the annual NPPA awards, lectures, Picture of the Year, TV News Clip Contest, Best of TV Photojournalism, and Best of Photojournalism.

The collection consists of hundreds of hours of footage from Parade of Quartets, a gospel program aired on WJBF-TV in Augusta, Georgia. This collection documents decades of regional gospel music performances, religious practices, and political activities, and represents possibly the largest collection of gospel performance footage at any North American library. The collection is a rare example of a sustained African American media presence on a southern television affiliate.

The collection consists of 8mm home movies from the Dunn family depicting Mexico and the Yucatan, California, Georgia, the Everglades and Jekyll Island. Also included is footage of a wedding.
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