12 collections

collection area: date:

The collection consists of a 32.5 minute film, probably shot for insurance purposes, which focuses on the devastation of the commercial and governmental center of Gainesville, but also includes footage of damage to nearby residential areas. In particular, it features the damage to the public square, the county courthouse, the Georgia Power Company, the Cooper Pants Factory, and the First Methodist Church. The 1936 Gainesville tornado (part of a massive tornado outbreak across the Deep South that also heavily damaged Tupelo, Mississippi) is generally regarded as the fifth deadliest in U.S. history. Extensive recovery efforts involving many local, regional, state, and national resources eventually rebuilt Gainesville, culminating in the 1938 dedication of the new city hall and county courthouse by President Franklin Roosevelt.

The collection consists of one reel of footage of the town of Bowman, Georgia in 1938.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The Rayburn Moore collection consists of footage related to the Moore family. Also included are two reels of film showing touring performances of KFFA Radio's "King Biscuit Time," and one reel showing a walking tour around Ralston Purina's Research Farm outside of St. Louis, Missouri. One of the King Biscuit Time reels is a circa 1943 country store performance by blues artists Sonny Boy Williamson and Robert Junior Lockwood. The second King Biscuit Time reel is a 1952 bus performing tour of various Arkansas locations by Sonny Boy Williamson and other African-American performers.

The collection consists of a film made in 1936 about Cordele, Georgia, plus outtakes. It and others like it were made by itinerant filmmakers, a niche market in filmmaking from the 1920s through the 1950s. These men traveled various regions of the country with camera and film, usually partnering with Chambers of Commerce to photograph people and businesses in town, then to show the film at the local movie theater where townsfolk flocked to pay to see themselves on the screen. This film in particular was made by itinerant photographer H.C. Kunkleman for his company, Pacific Film Productions, based in Erie, Pennsylvania. Included are scenes of the town of Cordele and its citizens (police officers, barbers, etc), local schools and students (O'neal Grade School and Northern Heights School), and local businesses (a cinema, Cordele Banking Company, LeRoys Cafe, a barber shop, Bob's Place). There are DVD viewing copies as well as one 35mm soundtrack negative, one 35mm picture negative, two 35mm fine grain prints, three 35mm answer prints, and one DigiBeta master.

c. 1917-c. 1960s

Audio recordings related to the Gone With the Wind premiere in Atlanta.

Recordings of church services and choral and gospel music. Many recordings occurred at historically black colleges and universities (HCBUs) and African American churches. 

One 16mm film depicting the city of Savannah, Georgia in 1936.

"Pathe Baby was the trade name for a 9.5 mm home movie system introduced in France for Christmas 1922. An extensive catalog of existing Pathe Freres films were issued in this new format. The first were only 30 feet long -- about 90 seconds of cranking. But the innovative freeze frame mechanism lengthened the showing time by not wasting footage on title cards. In 1924, film length was increased to 60 feet. In 1928, Super reel films that were 300 feet long were introduced. 9.5 mm persisted as the 'standard' format in Europe thru the 1950's. Pathex was the trade name of Pathe Exchange, Inc., Pathe's US subsidiary. In America, film exchanges distributed movie releases to theaters. The 9.5 mm format was introduced in America for Christmas of 1925 (Model D projectors)."--pathex.com
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