7 collections

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The collection consists of a 32.5 minute film, probably shot for insurance purposes, which focuses on the devastation of the commercial and governmental center of Gainesville, but also includes footage of damage to nearby residential areas. In particular, it features the damage to the public square, the county courthouse, the Georgia Power Company, the Cooper Pants Factory, and the First Methodist Church. The 1936 Gainesville tornado (part of a massive tornado outbreak across the Deep South that also heavily damaged Tupelo, Mississippi) is generally regarded as the fifth deadliest in U.S. history. Extensive recovery efforts involving many local, regional, state, and national resources eventually rebuilt Gainesville, culminating in the 1938 dedication of the new city hall and county courthouse by President Franklin Roosevelt.

The collection consists of one reel of footage of the town of Bowman, Georgia in 1938.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The collection consists of twenty-nine 9.5mm film reels. There are 16 commercially-produced 30 ft. Pathex films in their original boxes: 1.) The Cuttle Fish; 2.) The Death Head Hawk Moth; 3.) The Sacred Beetle; 4.) The Horned Toad; 5.) Bill and Bob in 'A Meeting with Reynard' (60 ft.); 6.) Mytiliculture; 7.) Making of an Artificial Rose; 8.) Salt of Vendee; 9.) Salt in Vendee; 10.) Fancy Mud (60 ft.); 11.) Japanese Lilies; 12.) Pathex Review No. 3: Fighting the River Flowers - Signs of Spring - Philippine Flappers; 13.) Arab Women; 14.) Arab Milliners; 15.) Ruins of Dougga, Tunis; and 16.) The Great Moslem Prayer. The other reels are home movies shot by Carl Leo Ottosen (1902-1991), the donor's father, circa late 1920s-1930s; they include footage of family members Carl Johann Ottosen (Carl Leo's father), Karen O. Ottosen (Carl Leo's mother), Esther Nova Jacobsen Ottosen (Carl Leo's wife), June Alice Ottosen (Carl Leo's sister), Agda and Oscar Benson (Carl Leo's aunt and uncle), and Peter and Lillie Overgaard (also an aunt and uncle). There are also street scenes from Copenhagen, a Danish farm, backyard scenes from Chicago and some shipboard footage . Also included are one 9.5mm Pathex camera, one 9.5mm Pathex projector (20,070) in original box, one Pathex instruction manual ("Photographing with the Pathex Motion Picture Camera"), and various Pathex accessories, including a cleaning and repair kit, a light bulb and a lamp.

This collection is made up of several different groups of film and videotape which have come to the Media Archives since 1995. As with many collections, not everything produced by the Georgia Center is in the Media Archives, but we hold a broad representation of their material. The Georgia Center and the UGA Art Department at one time maintained a storage building where a once-circulating collection of educational and industrial films were stored. Those films eventually came to the Libraries' Media Archives and have been called the Georgia Center Film Collection. When the Media Archives was established in 1995, those films were brought here. Some of the films date back to the 1930s, though it is likely that these are later reprinted copies of earlier-produced films. The earliest known 2" videotape of a Georgia Center production that we hold was donated to us by Patrick Shields, "A Day with Jimmie Driftwood" which we believe dates to the early 1960s. In 2004, we received the bulk of the Georgia Center's taped programs consisting of tapes of educational programs on campus, continuing education programs, and original productions. A broad range of subjects is covered, including famous Georgians (Dean Rusk, Lamar Dodd, et al.), educational materials, and significant events at the University, among many others.

The collection consists of a film made in 1936 about Cordele, Georgia, plus outtakes. It and others like it were made by itinerant filmmakers, a niche market in filmmaking from the 1920s through the 1950s. These men traveled various regions of the country with camera and film, usually partnering with Chambers of Commerce to photograph people and businesses in town, then to show the film at the local movie theater where townsfolk flocked to pay to see themselves on the screen. This film in particular was made by itinerant photographer H.C. Kunkleman for his company, Pacific Film Productions, based in Erie, Pennsylvania. Included are scenes of the town of Cordele and its citizens (police officers, barbers, etc), local schools and students (O'neal Grade School and Northern Heights School), and local businesses (a cinema, Cordele Banking Company, LeRoys Cafe, a barber shop, Bob's Place). There are DVD viewing copies as well as one 35mm soundtrack negative, one 35mm picture negative, two 35mm fine grain prints, three 35mm answer prints, and one DigiBeta master.
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