49 collections

date:

1930-1988

The collection consists of 14 Bankers boxes of audiocasssettes containing over 3100 radio programs taped off-air. Programs include: That Was the Week That Was; Frontier Gentleman; G.I. Journal; The Cavalcade of America; Studio One; Lum and Abner, etc.

The collection consists of sound recordings of Elmo Ellis editorials.

The collection consists of 21 films made by J. Aubrey Smith, donated by him in 2001, along with camera equipment he used and records he kept from his work (such as log books, maps to locations, notes on filming techniques, camera manuals, etc.). Smith's films were made for the Agricultural Extension Service. Some of them were sponsored by Rich's Department store. As sponsored films, they have a subtle or sometimes quite blatant message since the purpose of a sponsored film is to teach about or exhort the viewer to use a service or product. Since he was working for an agricultural entity, these films are primarily about improving agriculture, growing better crops, eliminating insects, and being efficient in the home and on the farm. During the post-World War II years as America was expanding economically, these films promoted the idea that a better life could be had through education, proper exploitation of local resources (such as the Agricultural Extension Service), more efficient use of home and farm equipment, all by tapping in to the improvements that had come from the war. The result would be an improvement of one's community by improving one's life, whether that be by using chemical pesticides, buying one's draperies at Rich's, joining a co-op, or learning new farming methods.

The collection consists of audio recordings and segments of various programs penned by Sloane, as well as recordings of some of his lectures, interviews, and phone conferences. Among the programs available are The Right to Live (1947, NBC) and Joy of Bach (1978). The only videocassette in the collection is a recording of part one of Kids Like These.

Because of its business and housing content, we believe this 16mm color amateur film of scenes in and around Athens was made by Joel A. Wier. We date the original film to 1947 because the films screening at the downtown theaters - the Ritz, the Georgia, and the Palace - are "The Dark Corner" (released in April 1946), "The Jolson Story" (released in October 1946), "The Razor's Edge" (released in December 1946), and "Valley of Fear" (released in February 1947). The two earlier films may have taken some time to get to Athens after their initial New York and Los Angeles premieres. The more striking aspects of the footage are the extreme differences shown between the houses along Milledge and Prince Avenues, and the African-American neighborhoods, as well as the then fairly new public housing and apartments along Broad Street. These neighborhoods have been identified as "Tip Toe Alley" (between Finley and Newton Streets at Baxter Street) and "Linden Town" (Lumpkin near Baxter), both of which were razed for public housing and for University of Georgia expansion. Also included is footage of local service organization members (Kiwanis, Pilot Club) gathering for lunch downtown, local bankers and businessmen outside their buildings, a scene of the Chamber of Commerce building, aerial views of Athens, a livestock auction at the Northeast Georgia Livestock Association building, a Shriners parade downtown, the airport, UGA campus scenes, the Garden Club of Georgia's Founders Garden, a golf course, Athens General Hospital, and the Rodgers Hosiery Company.

The collection consists of 1368 radio transcription discs from several UCLA collections. Titles in this collection include: Al Clauser and His Oklahoma Outlaws; The Ballet; Bing Crosby; Carnation Bouquet; Carnation Contented Hour (extensive run); Carnation Family Party; Casey, Crime Photographer; Chuck Wagon Group; Father Knows Best (extensive run); Flynn and Quinn; Good News of 1939; Hallmark Playhouse; Heartbeat Theatre (extensive run); I Can't Leave Her Behind; Labor Arbitration; Lone Journey; Louella Parsons Show; Mystery Is My Hobby (extensive run); NBC Symphony; National Farm and Home Hour; Oklahoma Roundup; President Truman speech; "Red" Carnation Gives a Weekend Party; Rising Tide; Scientific Dissertation; Sons of the Pioneers Show (extensive run); Stars Over Hollywood; Suspense; This Is Your FBI (extensive run); Uncle Tom's Cabin; We're Very Fussy On the Radio/How to Break Into Radio; What's Doin' Ladies.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes. Mr. Avery, a UGA graduate, focused his camera on crops such as cotton, peanuts, sugar cane, and many others and the traditional farming practices of the time. Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church appears in his footage along with every other church in the county and the Temple located in Bainbridge. Also included in this amateur footage is a hospital built in Bainbridge by African-American physician Dr. Joseph Howard Griffin.

To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The collection consists of footage of Gordon and Macon (including downtown scenes), Georgia, and families based in Gordon. There are also some early home movies of a kaolin mine's operation that were transferred from their original 16mm to VHS in the 1980s ; the Walter J. Brown Media Archive does not have the original 16mm film. Also included is footage of numerous beach vacation trips in Georgia and Florida, mountain trips, picnics, a trip to England and Scotland, scenes of Central of Georgia railroad trains and stations, a mobile x-ray clinic for tuberculosis, family pets (cat and dog), birthday parties, Zoo Atlanta, Willie B. II gorilla, petting zoos, parades (including centennial of the Civil War parade and a Halloween parade), the Gordon mines, Rock Eagle, Warner Robbins, and miscellaneous family footage.

The Ethridge home movies depict life on Southern farm land which was originally settled in 1799 and is now known as the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. The films specifically document the mid-20th century (since 1939), showing Georgia farm life, and the family and Southern travels of Ira Lanis Ethridge.

Major Gibson’s black and white and color home movies span 1942 through 1954 and document family life in base housing, time off with several groups of friends, the interior of base offices, bomber aircraft, and a parade in Butler, Georgia. Particularly of interest is footage of the Gibsons’ son, Bill, as an infant in what is a very typical family home movie scene - walking and crawling on the lawn outside the home with his mother, Wilma. What was a rather ordinary scene becomes more interesting when Mrs. Gibson holds up in front of young Bill a sign reading "14 August 1945 V-J Day Today."

The collection consists of home movies from the Hammond family. Included are scenes from World War II, home life, Christmas, a farm and a lake.

The collection consists of Louis C. Harris, Sr.'s entire home movie collection (1942-1960) of silent, black-and-white and color, camera-original, 8mm and 16mm home movie footage shot between 1942 and 1960 in Italy; Algiers; Augusta, Georgia; Florida; South Carolina; and Yucca Flat, Nevada; and three commercial 16mm films. The National Film Preservation Foundation generously funded full film preservation of several reels of Mr. Harris's home movies. Three reels of Kodachrome document a July, 8 1953 soap box derby sponsored by the Augusta Chronicle. But three months before this innocent American pastime, Mr. Harris was invited by the government, as a member of the press, to witness a 16-kiloton atomic blast at Yucca Flat, Nevada, on March 17, 1953. He made a short Kodachrome 16mm film of his trip west which includes scenes at the Phoenix, Arizona airport; day and evening shots of the Las Vegas Strip including the famous "Vegas Vic" waving cowboy neon sign erected in 1951 (the Pioneer Club casino which it advertised closed in 1995); at Indian Springs AFB where atomic bomb drop planes were being "decontaminated" with water and brooms after blast flyovers; at the test location with other journalists being briefed; the atomic blast itself; and colleagues present just after the test. His newspaper accounts of the events that week (available on microfilm in the UGA Main Library) describe the safety of the test and the need for Americans to prepare for potential nuclear war. The family's papers and Mr. Harris's home audio disc recordings are also at UGA.

The collection consists of footage shot in various locations, including Orangeburg and Edisto Beach, South Carolina (c. 1946/1947); Iran and Portugal (1964); and Berlin, Prague and Portofino (1965). There is also footage of marlin fishing in Mexico in June, 1965. Included is a purchased black-and-white film about Florida water park acts entitled "Aqua Frolics."

The collection consists of home movies from the family of Dr. Gail Jackson. Included is footage of a 1947 road trip on Route 66 West from Joplin, Missouri to Flagstaff, Arizona, the Grand Canyon, Utah and Colorado, and other locations; a 1948 trip through the Tetons, Yellowstone, Cheyenne, etc, and a dude ranch; a Castle Heights graduation featuring Bernarr MacFadden; an Officer Candidate School graduation in Newport, Rhode Island; and miscellaneous events in the family's life, such as scenes of the farm and home, snow in Vincennes, and a birthday party for Frederic L. Jackson.

The collection consists of home movies from the McNeel family. Highlights include footage of McNeel Marble Company, a large builder of monuments located in Marietta, Georgia.

The Rayburn Moore collection consists of footage related to the Moore family. Also included are two reels of film showing touring performances of KFFA Radio's "King Biscuit Time," and one reel showing a walking tour around Ralston Purina's Research Farm outside of St. Louis, Missouri. One of the King Biscuit Time reels is a circa 1943 country store performance by blues artists Sonny Boy Williamson and Robert Junior Lockwood. The second King Biscuit Time reel is a 1952 bus performing tour of various Arkansas locations by Sonny Boy Williamson and other African-American performers.

The collection consists of John Newman's home movies, including a reel of construction sites of buildings built by his father's construction business, Newman Construction Company; Newman Construction Company's projects in 1937, 1938 and 1939 (including several Public Works Administration projects); and one short reel of John F. Kennedy's appearance at the La Grange, Georgia, airport in October 1960. Other scenes from Newman's home movies include children's birthdays, holidays, a wedding (with footage of the bride preparing for the ceremony and the table of gifts), Panama City (Florida), Christmas, and school pageants, as well as other scenes around LaGrange, Georgia. The films were shot by John R. Newman (father of Fred Newman) and Claire Newman.

The collection consists of home movies from William Oddy, filmed from the 1920s to the 1940s. Locations depicted include Michigan; Ontario; Lake Louise; Banff, Alberta; Alaska; Georgian Bay; and a trip through the southern United States.

The collection consists of six reels of home movies showing an outdoor baseball game, a train yard and railroad crew, children playing, beach scenes in Florida, cleanup of a train wreck, and outdoor snow scenes.

The collection consists of home movies of Frank Sheffield of Americus, Georgia and his family, recorded over a period of forty years, from 1925-1965. Highlights include footage of England in the 1930s (Trafalgar Square, opening of Parliament, street scenes, the Thames, Whipsnade Zoo, Queen Mary in the historic royal coach); the Harrold-Sheffield wedding; the Sheffields' honeymoon at Lakemont; a dinner party thrown by the Sheffields in 1932; the Sheffield and Harrold family servants; Lindbergh's transatlantic flight; scenes of Americus, Georgia; New Orleans in the 1940s; pyramids in Yucatan, Cuervavaca and Taxco; a Southern Field Flying Jennie airshow from the 1960s; and a trip to Cape Cod.

The collection consists of home movies from the Sparks family, including Jackson Gillen Sparks, Rosa Gillen Sparks, Francis Linton Sparks, Sr., Maybell Sparks and Francis Linton Sparks, Jr. The movies were shot in Warrenton, Georgia; at the Citadel in South Carolina; and in Florida. Included is footage of Warrenton homes, gardens and residents; a family vacation to Marineland, Florida; swimming in the family pool; a 1938 "Kiddie Parade"; and the site of a February 1938 plane crash near Warrenton that killed a US Department of Labor mediator en route to Puerto Rico. The movies were at least partially filmed by Francis Linton Sparks, Sr.

The collection consists of home movies of Nancy Stephens and her family, dating from circa 1929-1960. Some films document Stephens College, which Nancy attended. There is also early footage (1929, 1930) of several men golfing. Otherwise, the footage consists primarily of family members and friends at birthday parties, Christmas, weddings; children playing outdoors, family pets; travel to Louisiana, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Washington (D.C.), Portland (Oregon), Colorado Springs, Canada, Kansas City and Plattsburg (Missouri).

The collection consists of 16mm black-and-white and color home movies filmed in and around Butler, Ga. at Suggs Machine Shop. Among the scenes included are people working at the shop, footage of a skidder (a piece of equipment used in logging), an icy day in Butler during Christmas 1943, many of Suggs' family members, various farm scenes (including flowering fruit trees, a chicken house, collecting of chicken eggs and a brooder house), and the airport at Columbus, Georgia.

The Turnbull Family Home Movie Collection is comprised of eleven 16mm color and black and white films taken between 1947 and 1957 by Samuel J. Turnbull. Mr. Turnbull was in the United States Army and took footage of Fort Dix, New Jersey in 1947 as well as Germany, Switzerland, France, Italy (1953), Belgium (1952), England (1952), Scotland (1952), and Japan (1957). Also included are shots of family vacations in Indiana and at Yellowstone National Park (1957) as well as family Christmas celebrations in 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, and 1954.

The collection consists of Williams family home movies shot between 1942 and 1960. They show typical family scenes, such as holiday celebrations, childrens' birthday parties, a wedding, trips to the beach, winter ice storms, picnics, a family reunion, and several shots of downtown Monroe, as well as a Monroe church and Sunday school letting out. Of local interest are 1948 scenes of a demonstration farm in Winder, Georgia, and the turkeys and cows of the Williams' family farm. Grant Park in Atlanta and its zoo are also featured several times. Both a Girl Scout camp and a Boy Scout camp are shown. Also, the earlier films taken during WWII show a captured Japanese submarine touring through Monroe. A 1943 Victory Parade includes children promoting scrap drives, victory gardening, an air raid group, and representations of the Four Freedoms. A recruiting drive in downtown Monroe features a damaged Luftwaffe warbird, and a dirigible patrols the shoreline while the family is at the beach. The bulk of the films are travel scenes by the family and also of Booth Williams at national conventions in Florida and Wichita. A 1949 trip from Georgia to the Western U.S. begins on U.S. Highway 41 and documents a portion of Peacock Alley - a country store selling chenille bedspreads, aprons, and bathrobes. Travels include: Stone Mountain, Georgia (view from top); Vogel State Park in north Georgia; the old market at Louisville, Georgia; Lookout Mountain, Georgia, and Point Park; Gatlinburg, Tennessee and Cherokee, North Carolina; Asheville, North Carolina, including a view of the Grove Park Inn; Edisto Beach, South Carolina; Florida: St. Augustine, Crystal River, Cypress Gardens, Gainesville, New Orleans, orange groves/packing houses; Texas: Houston, King Ranch cattle, San Antonio, Alamo; Louisville, Kentucky, Keeneland race track; Chicago, Illinois (cityscape and Shriners); Spokane, Washington; Western states trip (Omaha, Nebraska; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Badlands, South Dakota; Cedar Pass Lodge; Mount Rushmore; Yellowstone National Park; Salt Creek Falls, Oregon; Crater Lake Park, Oregon; California Redwoods, San Francisco, Yosemite, Los Angeles/Glendale, Hollywood Bowl, UCLA; Reno, Nevada; Hoover Dam; Grand Canyon; Petrified Forest and trading post; Salt Lake City, copper pit, Great Salt Lake, Reno; Cliff House (San Francisco); Disneyland); and the Northeastern United States and Canada, including the border crossing, and the White Mountains cog railway in New Hampshire.

The collection consists of off-air recordings of radio shows, including Amos n' Andy, the Ben Bernie Show, the Jack Benny Show, George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, and Kraft Music Hall, among others.

Consists of over 5 million feet of newsfilm from WSB-TV, Atlanta, Georgia. Footage covers the Civil Rights Movement, the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the political careers of Jimmy Carter, Julian Bond, Andrew Young, Maynard Jackson, Herman Talmadge, Lester Maddox, Carl Sanders, George Wallace, Richard Russell, William Hartsfield, and other prominent politicians. Some highlights from the footage are the 1961 desegregation of the University of Georgia, the 1961 Albany Movement, footage from the Orly Airport crash which killed 106 Atlanta arts patrons in Paris, and the 715th home run hit by Hank Aaron in 1974 to break the major league home run record. Other footage about transportation, the arts, business, people, land, sports, politics, and local events are also covered. Contains edited and raw footage. No televised newscasts are included.

The collection consists of home movies from Sanford Head and his family and friends. The footage mostly consists of travel footage; there are shots of West Virginia, England, Scotland, Paris and Burma, among other places. There is also footage of various family members and friends, and summer activities such as waterskiing and swimming.

The collection consists of 50 years of radio, television and film productions, papers, and photographs documenting the founding and growth of Protestant Radio and Television Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies of Fred Ware's life, dating from the 1930s to the 1960s. Included is footage of Fred as a baby; the family dog; trips to London, Florida, Tallulah Gorge, Dallas, various locations in Europe, and Jamaica; camping and fishing excursions; and Fred's first car.

The collection consists of films Mr. Eubanks’s father shot in Blakely, Georgia in the 1940s. Scenes are of downtown Blakely, teenagers, band members, outdoor footage, the town as seen from the water tower, hunting, and scenes around the home. VHS dub only.

The collection consists of home movies of Nell Epps and her family, dating from 1938-1970. There is footage of a pool and a garden, as well as some footage of Athens, Georgia.

This collection is made up of several different groups of film and videotape which have come to the Media Archives since 1995. As with many collections, not everything produced by the Georgia Center is in the Media Archives, but we hold a broad representation of their material. The Georgia Center and the UGA Art Department at one time maintained a storage building where a once-circulating collection of educational and industrial films were stored. Those films eventually came to the Libraries' Media Archives and have been called the Georgia Center Film Collection. When the Media Archives was established in 1995, those films were brought here. Some of the films date back to the 1930s, though it is likely that these are later reprinted copies of earlier-produced films. The earliest known 2" videotape of a Georgia Center production that we hold was donated to us by Patrick Shields, "A Day with Jimmie Driftwood" which we believe dates to the early 1960s. In 2004, we received the bulk of the Georgia Center's taped programs consisting of tapes of educational programs on campus, continuing education programs, and original productions. A broad range of subjects is covered, including famous Georgians (Dean Rusk, Lamar Dodd, et al.), educational materials, and significant events at the University, among many others.

The collection consists of home movies from Rob Winthrop's family. The films include footage of Groton Plantation during various hunts; bird hunts at the plantation; trips to England, Venice, Germany, Paris, and a yachting trip to Bermuda; an airshow; a hunting trip to the mountains of Mexico, including urban scenes, small village scenes, and pyramids; the family in New York City, interiors and exteriors around the city; theater district Fort Ethan Allen in Vermont; a 1933 visit to Santa Barbara; a sea voyage on the Empress of Britain going to England in 1933, and a wedding there; several London scenes including changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace; Croydon Airport 1934 and a Handley Page airplane; sculling at Henley in 1935; dogs, deer, horses, outdoor scenes, bird hunting, riding lessons, polo games; the 1947 Cheyenne Bots Sots parade; 1951 horse trials/competition and other horse shows; a christening; 1950s rowing competitions; and a safari trip to Africa in 1970.
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