14 collections

date:

The collection consists of 14 Bankers boxes of audiocasssettes containing over 3100 radio programs taped off-air. Programs include: That Was the Week That Was; Frontier Gentleman; G.I. Journal; The Cavalcade of America; Studio One; Lum and Abner, etc.

The Kaliska-Greenblatt Home Movie Collection is the most locally significant film footage in the home movie collections of the Walter J. Brown Media Archives. The films were taken by William Kaliska and his friend Sidney Greenblatt of Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. Kaliska's films date from the late 1920s to the mid-1930s and show the enthusiasm he had for taking film footage of the varied events he was involved with as a marketing manager for Coca-Cola. The films include the earliest known films of the UGA campus, being scenes at Harold Hirsch Hall (Law School), around the time of its dedication in 1932. Prominent in the group of people in that shot is Coca-Cola's then Vice President in Charge of Sales, Harrison Jones (UGA Class of 1900), later president of the company. This same reel contains the only known footage of Moses Michael, longtime Athens resident. His wife Emma appears with Jean Kaliska in the footage, and the young couple in the segment are the Michaels' son and daughter-in-law, David and Sarah Hall Michael and their children, at their house on Milledge, next to the Phi Epsilon House. Mr. Kaliska filmed carving work on Stone Mountain in 1929, and several university sporting events: a regional track meet at Georgia Tech's campus which includes Olympian Ed Hamm, and the UGA vs. Tech football game in Athens in 1929. He was also in Athens in Sanford Stadium for the UGA v. Tech baseball game and Senior Parade of 1929. Mr. Kaliska also filmed Tech football player Stumpy Thomason and the bear "Bruin" who is shown drinking a Coca-Cola. In July 1930, he was filming from a window of a building along Peachtree Street in Atlanta to capture parts of the July 1930 tickertape parade for Bobby Jones's Grand Slam. The reels also include a trip to Miami that Harold Hirsch took with family and friends. They stayed at one of Miami Beach's most prestigious hotels, the Roney Plaza Hotel. Aside from this and other archival footage, the original Roney Plaza exists only in old photographs and postcards. Hirsch's daughter, Ernestine, and cousin Jake's wife Marjorie and her son Jack are shown sunning at the hotel beachfront. During the trip, Hirsch's group cruised Biscayne Bay, and there are views of many long-gone Miami beachfront buildings, an alligator and an ostrich farm, Seminole Indians, and other cruise ships and lines which regularly traveled to Cuba. Mr. and Mrs. Kaliska were dog fanciers and owned schnauzers. A brief segment of the footage includes Beno Stein, a dog trainer in Atlanta, likely connected with the Atlanta Kennel Club, putting several dogs through a routine around a training obstacle course. One of the reels is of a garden party at the Atlanta mansion of Robert and Nell Woodruff (Coca-Cola magnate and his Athens-born wife) for the wife of a California Coca-Cola executive who was visiting Atlanta. Another depicts a day of fun at the Brookhaven Country Club in 1939 - pitching horseshoes, swimming, golfing, and several people drinking Coca-Cola. There is also footage of a ride in the Goodyear blimp "Defender" from Atlanta Airport around 1930; the footage was used in a 2007 Georgia Public Broadcasting documentary, The South Takes Flight: 100 Years of Aviation in Georgia. The Kaliskas and friends filmed a vacation to the Cumberland Gap area and Nashville, including President Polk's grave, and Kentucky. There are summer camp scenes shot at Camp Victor, connected to the Atlanta Hebrew Orphans Home. There is also footage of the family of prominent Atlanta businessman Victor H. Kriegshaber at their home.

The collection consists of home movies from William Oddy, filmed from the 1920s to the 1940s. Locations depicted include Michigan; Ontario; Lake Louise; Banff, Alberta; Alaska; Georgian Bay; and a trip through the southern United States.

The collection consists of home movies of Frank Sheffield of Americus, Georgia and his family, recorded over a period of forty years, from 1925-1965. Highlights include footage of England in the 1930s (Trafalgar Square, opening of Parliament, street scenes, the Thames, Whipsnade Zoo, Queen Mary in the historic royal coach); the Harrold-Sheffield wedding; the Sheffields' honeymoon at Lakemont; a dinner party thrown by the Sheffields in 1932; the Sheffield and Harrold family servants; Lindbergh's transatlantic flight; scenes of Americus, Georgia; New Orleans in the 1940s; pyramids in Yucatan, Cuervavaca and Taxco; a Southern Field Flying Jennie airshow from the 1960s; and a trip to Cape Cod.

The collection consists of home movies of Nancy Stephens and her family, dating from circa 1929-1960. Some films document Stephens College, which Nancy attended. There is also early footage (1929, 1930) of several men golfing. Otherwise, the footage consists primarily of family members and friends at birthday parties, Christmas, weddings; children playing outdoors, family pets; travel to Louisiana, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Washington (D.C.), Portland (Oregon), Colorado Springs, Canada, Kansas City and Plattsburg (Missouri).

The collection consists of home movies of the Finley and Miller families (especially "Duddy" Finley, Elizabeth "Lady Bug" Peirce Miller, Harry Miller, and Lady's Bug's parents) from the late 1920s taken in Chicago, Ill., Canaan, Conn., Wisconsin, and Niagara Falls, N.Y. Reel 1 is from 1926 and features Duddy Finley on a tricycle in a park with her mother and Harry Miller; there are also scenes around Chicago Navy Pier and Lincoln Park. Reel 2 (1926) contains scenes of Lady Bug's family playing in the snow, a shot of a downtown street in Canaan with "Ives & Peirce Coal & Grain" store. Reel 3 (1927) shows the family swimming at Twin Lakes, a playground, children dancing, a girl doing the Charleston dance, and other family scenes. Reel 4 (1928) contains swimming scenes, adults dressed in Victorian clothing, girls dancing, and a cat. The last reel (no. 5, 1929) features wire-haired terriers and puppies in a backyard, little girls paying with dolls and a dollhouse, a large country house in winter, a sign reading "Barry Kennels: Equally Well Known Both Sides of Atlantic, Owned by Roger Phillips," dogs in kennels in the snow, the family in snow, a lakeside community, and Niagara Falls.

The collection consists of off-air recordings of radio shows, including Amos n' Andy, the Ben Bernie Show, the Jack Benny Show, George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, and Kraft Music Hall, among others.

The collection consists of twenty-nine 9.5mm film reels. There are 16 commercially-produced 30 ft. Pathex films in their original boxes: 1.) The Cuttle Fish; 2.) The Death Head Hawk Moth; 3.) The Sacred Beetle; 4.) The Horned Toad; 5.) Bill and Bob in 'A Meeting with Reynard' (60 ft.); 6.) Mytiliculture; 7.) Making of an Artificial Rose; 8.) Salt of Vendee; 9.) Salt in Vendee; 10.) Fancy Mud (60 ft.); 11.) Japanese Lilies; 12.) Pathex Review No. 3: Fighting the River Flowers - Signs of Spring - Philippine Flappers; 13.) Arab Women; 14.) Arab Milliners; 15.) Ruins of Dougga, Tunis; and 16.) The Great Moslem Prayer. The other reels are home movies shot by Carl Leo Ottosen (1902-1991), the donor's father, circa late 1920s-1930s; they include footage of family members Carl Johann Ottosen (Carl Leo's father), Karen O. Ottosen (Carl Leo's mother), Esther Nova Jacobsen Ottosen (Carl Leo's wife), June Alice Ottosen (Carl Leo's sister), Agda and Oscar Benson (Carl Leo's aunt and uncle), and Peter and Lillie Overgaard (also an aunt and uncle). There are also street scenes from Copenhagen, a Danish farm, backyard scenes from Chicago and some shipboard footage . Also included are one 9.5mm Pathex camera, one 9.5mm Pathex projector (20,070) in original box, one Pathex instruction manual ("Photographing with the Pathex Motion Picture Camera"), and various Pathex accessories, including a cleaning and repair kit, a light bulb and a lamp.

The collection consists of home movies from Rob Winthrop's family. The films include footage of Groton Plantation during various hunts; bird hunts at the plantation; trips to England, Venice, Germany, Paris, and a yachting trip to Bermuda; an airshow; a hunting trip to the mountains of Mexico, including urban scenes, small village scenes, and pyramids; the family in New York City, interiors and exteriors around the city; theater district Fort Ethan Allen in Vermont; a 1933 visit to Santa Barbara; a sea voyage on the Empress of Britain going to England in 1933, and a wedding there; several London scenes including changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace; Croydon Airport 1934 and a Handley Page airplane; sculling at Henley in 1935; dogs, deer, horses, outdoor scenes, bird hunting, riding lessons, polo games; the 1947 Cheyenne Bots Sots parade; 1951 horse trials/competition and other horse shows; a christening; 1950s rowing competitions; and a safari trip to Africa in 1970.
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