16 collections

collection area: date:

The collection consists of sound recordings of Elmo Ellis editorials.

The collection consists of 21 films made by J. Aubrey Smith, donated by him in 2001, along with camera equipment he used and records he kept from his work (such as log books, maps to locations, notes on filming techniques, camera manuals, etc.). Smith's films were made for the Agricultural Extension Service. Some of them were sponsored by Rich's Department store. As sponsored films, they have a subtle or sometimes quite blatant message since the purpose of a sponsored film is to teach about or exhort the viewer to use a service or product. Since he was working for an agricultural entity, these films are primarily about improving agriculture, growing better crops, eliminating insects, and being efficient in the home and on the farm. During the post-World War II years as America was expanding economically, these films promoted the idea that a better life could be had through education, proper exploitation of local resources (such as the Agricultural Extension Service), more efficient use of home and farm equipment, all by tapping in to the improvements that had come from the war. The result would be an improvement of one's community by improving one's life, whether that be by using chemical pesticides, buying one's draperies at Rich's, joining a co-op, or learning new farming methods.

Because of its business and housing content, we believe this 16mm color amateur film of scenes in and around Athens was made by Joel A. Wier. We date the original film to 1947 because the films screening at the downtown theaters - the Ritz, the Georgia, and the Palace - are "The Dark Corner" (released in April 1946), "The Jolson Story" (released in October 1946), "The Razor's Edge" (released in December 1946), and "Valley of Fear" (released in February 1947). The two earlier films may have taken some time to get to Athens after their initial New York and Los Angeles premieres. The more striking aspects of the footage are the extreme differences shown between the houses along Milledge and Prince Avenues, and the African-American neighborhoods, as well as the then fairly new public housing and apartments along Broad Street. These neighborhoods have been identified as "Tip Toe Alley" (between Finley and Newton Streets at Baxter Street) and "Linnentown" (Lumpkin near Baxter), both of which were razed for public housing and for University of Georgia expansion. Also included is footage of local service organization members (Kiwanis, Pilot Club) gathering for lunch downtown, local bankers and businessmen outside their buildings, a scene of the Chamber of Commerce building, aerial views of Athens, a livestock auction at the Northeast Georgia Livestock Association building, a Shriners parade downtown, the airport, UGA campus scenes, the Garden Club of Georgia's Founders Garden, a golf course, Athens General Hospital, and the Rodgers Hosiery Company.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The Rayburn Moore collection consists of footage related to the Moore family. Also included are two reels of film showing touring performances of KFFA Radio's "King Biscuit Time," and one reel showing a walking tour around Ralston Purina's Research Farm outside of St. Louis, Missouri. One of the King Biscuit Time reels is a circa 1943 country store performance by blues artists Sonny Boy Williamson and Robert Junior Lockwood. The second King Biscuit Time reel is a 1952 bus performing tour of various Arkansas locations by Sonny Boy Williamson and other African-American performers.

Consists of over 5 million feet of newsfilm from WSB-TV, Atlanta, Georgia dating from 1948-1981. Contains edited and raw footage. No televised newscasts are included.

The collection consists of 50 years of radio, television and film productions, papers, and photographs documenting the founding and growth of Protestant Radio and Television Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The collection consists of an "Our Hometown" type of town film, made in 1947 by Sol Landsman and Arthur Loevin. The film depicts the people and businesses of Swainsboro, Georgia.

The collection consists of a film about Fitzgerald, Georgia, made in 1947 by Sol Landsman. Included is footage of various citizens, the rotary club, various schools in the town, Allen's Super Market, M.M. Fletcher Buick, a Chevrolet dealer, Liles Bros. Dairy Products, a cinema, and the Central Methodist Church. In the collection there are one 35mm soundtrack negative, one 35mm picture negative, one 35mm print, one DigiBeta master, and one DVD viewing copy.

The collection consists of radio transcription discs of recordings by Eddie Cannon and His Radio Playboys (featuring Ruby Lee Yopp Havis), originally aired on WBML Radio in Macon, Georgia.

Home movies, professional films, outtakes, audio formats, and videotapes made by "Doc" Tommy Scott during his long career as a musician and traveling medicine show man.

Contains aluminum transcription discs of radio programs: Rich's Program and Look Who's Here.

Recordings of church services and choral and gospel music. Many recordings occurred at historically black colleges and universities (HCBUs) and African American churches. 

"Pathe Baby was the trade name for a 9.5 mm home movie system introduced in France for Christmas 1922. An extensive catalog of existing Pathe Freres films were issued in this new format. The first were only 30 feet long -- about 90 seconds of cranking. But the innovative freeze frame mechanism lengthened the showing time by not wasting footage on title cards. In 1924, film length was increased to 60 feet. In 1928, Super reel films that were 300 feet long were introduced. 9.5 mm persisted as the 'standard' format in Europe thru the 1950's. Pathex was the trade name of Pathe Exchange, Inc., Pathe's US subsidiary. In America, film exchanges distributed movie releases to theaters. The 9.5 mm format was introduced in America for Christmas of 1925 (Model D projectors)."--pathex.com
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