7 collections

collection area: date:

1930-1988

The collection consists of a 15 tape set on 3/4-inch U-Matic videocassettes of Georgia writers reading and discussing their work on the University of Georgia campus May 16-18, 1985. Authors include Raymond Andrews, Mary Hood, John Oliver Killens, James Dickey, Harry Crews, Bettie Sellers and David Bottoms, among others. VHS copies are available for viewing on site.

The collection consists of audio of "Reflections on Georgia" that were produced for broadcast on WUGA on old farm ways, saints and spirits, etc. Also included is audio of "Folklore in Georgia" featuring performances of local folk musicians including Howard Finster. "Bicentennial Minutes" features information about Georgia and UGA.

ca. 1960-1999

This collection contains approximately 2000 1/4" open reels and cartridges (or carts) from the University of Georgia student-run radio station WUOG. The recordings run from 1973 until approximately 2003 and contain original programs and recordings. Some of the programs in the collection feature performances by REM, the B52s, Pylon, and Love Tractor, among others.

The collection consists of film and video of the University of Georgia's Redcoat Band. The footage was taken from 1976-1983 and features many halftime shows from those years.

This collection is made up of several different groups of film and videotape which have come to the Media Archives since 1995. As with many collections, not everything produced by the Georgia Center is in the Media Archives, but we hold a broad representation of their material. The Georgia Center and the UGA Art Department at one time maintained a storage building where a once-circulating collection of educational and industrial films were stored. Those films eventually came to the Libraries' Media Archives and have been called the Georgia Center Film Collection. When the Media Archives was established in 1995, those films were brought here. Some of the films date back to the 1930s, though it is likely that these are later reprinted copies of earlier-produced films. The earliest known 2" videotape of a Georgia Center production that we hold was donated to us by Patrick Shields, "A Day with Jimmie Driftwood" which we believe dates to the early 1960s. In 2004, we received the bulk of the Georgia Center's taped programs consisting of tapes of educational programs on campus, continuing education programs, and original productions. A broad range of subjects is covered, including famous Georgians (Dean Rusk, Lamar Dodd, et al.), educational materials, and significant events at the University, among many others.
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