69 collections

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The collection consists of home movies from Sanford Head and his family and friends. The footage mostly consists of travel footage; there are shots of West Virginia, England, Scotland, Paris and Burma, among other places. There is also footage of various family members and friends, and summer activities such as waterskiing and swimming.

The collection consists of 50 years of radio, television and film productions, papers, and photographs documenting the founding and growth of Protestant Radio and Television Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies of Fred Ware's life, dating from the 1930s to the 1960s. Included is footage of Fred as a baby; the family dog; trips to London, Florida, Tallulah Gorge, Dallas, various locations in Europe, and Jamaica; camping and fishing excursions; and Fred's first car.

The collection consists of films Mr. Eubanks’s father shot in Blakely, Georgia in the 1940s. Scenes are of downtown Blakely, teenagers, band members, outdoor footage, the town as seen from the water tower, hunting, and scenes around the home. VHS dub only.

The collection consists of home movies of Nelle Epps and her family, dating from 1938-1970. There is footage of a pool and a garden, as well as some footage of Athens, Georgia.

"Pathe Baby was the trade name for a 9.5 mm home movie system introduced in France for Christmas 1922. An extensive catalog of existing Pathe Freres films were issued in this new format. The first were only 30 feet long -- about 90 seconds of cranking. But the innovative freeze frame mechanism lengthened the showing time by not wasting footage on title cards. In 1924, film length was increased to 60 feet. In 1928, Super reel films that were 300 feet long were introduced. 9.5 mm persisted as the 'standard' format in Europe thru the 1950's. Pathex was the trade name of Pathe Exchange, Inc., Pathe's US subsidiary. In America, film exchanges distributed movie releases to theaters. The 9.5 mm format was introduced in America for Christmas of 1925 (Model D projectors)."--pathex.com

The collection consists of home movies from Rob Winthrop's family. The films include footage of Groton Plantation during various hunts; bird hunts at the plantation; trips to England, Venice, Germany, Paris, and a yachting trip to Bermuda; an airshow; a hunting trip to the mountains of Mexico, including urban scenes, small village scenes, and pyramids; the family in New York City, interiors and exteriors around the city; theater district Fort Ethan Allen in Vermont; a 1933 visit to Santa Barbara; a sea voyage on the Empress of Britain going to England in 1933, and a wedding there; several London scenes including changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace; Croydon Airport 1934 and a Handley Page airplane; sculling at Henley in 1935; dogs, deer, horses, outdoor scenes, bird hunting, riding lessons, polo games; the 1947 Cheyenne Bots Sots parade; 1951 horse trials/competition and other horse shows; a christening; 1950s rowing competitions; and a safari trip to Africa in 1970.

The collection consists of home movies from the Foley family. Also included are two commercially-produced reels of Kodak: 1.) "Cinegraph Eight: Midnight on a Pullman," no. 84550 available from Dec. 1932 to Dec. 1943, being an excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "In New York," and, 2.) "Always in Trouble," no. 84546 available from September 1932 and discontinued in December 1943. Excerpt from a longer 'Our Gang' Cinegraph called "It's a Bear." In addition, there is one commercially-produced audio testing reel, "Norelco 101 Demonstration Tape 1-7/8 two track battery operated transistor tape recorder," with seven songs on each side.

Five films that highlight Dr. James' dog and opossum behavioral research.

The collection consists of home movies from the Ware family reunions over a period of approximately 30 years. The footage features family members appearing in front of the camera so that their names could be recorded.

The collection consists of a film about Fitzgerald, Georgia, made in 1947 by Sol Landsman. Included is footage of various citizens, the rotary club, various schools in the town, Allen's Super Market, M.M. Fletcher Buick, a Chevrolet dealer, Liles Bros. Dairy Products, a cinema, and the Central Methodist Church. In the collection there are one 35mm soundtrack negative, one 35mm picture negative, one 35mm print, one DigiBeta master, and one DVD viewing copy.

The collection consists of Williams family home movies shot between 1942 and 1960. They show typical family scenes, such as holiday celebrations, childrens' birthday parties, a wedding, trips to the beach, winter ice storms, picnics, a family reunion, and several shots of downtown Monroe, as well as a Monroe church and Sunday school letting out. Of local interest are 1948 scenes of a demonstration farm in Winder, Georgia, and the turkeys and cows of the Williams' family farm. Grant Park in Atlanta and its zoo are also featured several times. Both a Girl Scout camp and a Boy Scout camp are shown. Also, the earlier films taken during WWII show a captured Japanese submarine touring through Monroe. A 1943 Victory Parade includes children promoting scrap drives, victory gardening, an air raid group, and representations of the Four Freedoms. A recruiting drive in downtown Monroe features a damaged Luftwaffe warbird, and a dirigible patrols the shoreline while the family is at the beach. The bulk of the films are travel scenes by the family and also of Booth Williams at national conventions in Florida and Wichita. A 1949 trip from Georgia to the Western U.S. begins on U.S. Highway 41 and documents a portion of Peacock Alley - a country store selling chenille bedspreads, aprons, and bathrobes. Travels include: Stone Mountain, Georgia (view from top); Vogel State Park in north Georgia; the old market at Louisville, Georgia; Lookout Mountain, Georgia, and Point Park; Gatlinburg, Tennessee and Cherokee, North Carolina; Asheville, North Carolina, including a view of the Grove Park Inn; Edisto Beach, South Carolina; Florida: St. Augustine, Crystal River, Cypress Gardens, Gainesville, New Orleans, orange groves/packing houses; Texas: Houston, King Ranch cattle, San Antonio, Alamo; Louisville, Kentucky, Keeneland race track; Chicago, Illinois (cityscape and Shriners); Spokane, Washington; Western states trip (Omaha, Nebraska; Grand Forks, North Dakota; Badlands, South Dakota; Cedar Pass Lodge; Mount Rushmore; Yellowstone National Park; Salt Creek Falls, Oregon; Crater Lake Park, Oregon; California Redwoods, San Francisco, Yosemite, Los Angeles/Glendale, Hollywood Bowl, UCLA; Reno, Nevada; Hoover Dam; Grand Canyon; Petrified Forest and trading post; Salt Lake City, copper pit, Great Salt Lake, Reno; Cliff House (San Francisco); Disneyland); and the Northeastern United States and Canada, including the border crossing, and the White Mountains cog railway in New Hampshire.

The collection consists of radio transcription discs of recordings by Eddie Cannon and His Radio Playboys (featuring Ruby Lee Yopp Havis), originally aired on WBML Radio in Macon, Georgia.

An extensive number of videotapes and DVDs, focusing on reunions, the 94th Division's overseas campaigns, and veterans.

c. 1917-c. 1960s

Includes lectures and interviews by Dodd, J. J. Sweeney lectures, SREB Seminar on the Arts, Carl Holty, plus recordings related to Apollo 17 and the human heart.

Contains aluminum transcription discs of radio programs: Rich's Program and Look Who's Here.

The collection consists of footage shot in various locations, including Orangeburg and Edisto Beach, South Carolina (c. 1946/1947); Iran and Portugal (1964); and Berlin, Prague and Portofino (1965). There is also footage of marlin fishing in Mexico in June, 1965. Included is a purchased black-and-white film about Florida water park acts entitled "Aqua Frolics."

One home movie and one interview. 

The collection consists of sound recordings of Elmo Ellis editorials.

The collection consists of 21 films made by J. Aubrey Smith, donated by him in 2001, along with camera equipment he used and records he kept from his work (such as log books, maps to locations, notes on filming techniques, camera manuals, etc.). Smith's films were made for the Agricultural Extension Service. Some of them were sponsored by Rich's Department store. As sponsored films, they have a subtle or sometimes quite blatant message since the purpose of a sponsored film is to teach about or exhort the viewer to use a service or product. Since he was working for an agricultural entity, these films are primarily about improving agriculture, growing better crops, eliminating insects, and being efficient in the home and on the farm. During the post-World War II years as America was expanding economically, these films promoted the idea that a better life could be had through education, proper exploitation of local resources (such as the Agricultural Extension Service), more efficient use of home and farm equipment, all by tapping in to the improvements that had come from the war. The result would be an improvement of one's community by improving one's life, whether that be by using chemical pesticides, buying one's draperies at Rich's, joining a co-op, or learning new farming methods.

The collection consists of audio recordings and segments of various programs penned by Sloane, as well as recordings of some of his lectures, interviews, and phone conferences. Among the programs available are The Right to Live (1947, NBC) and Joy of Bach (1978). The only videocassette in the collection is a recording of part one of Kids Like These.

Because of its business and housing content, we believe this 16mm color amateur film of scenes in and around Athens was made by Joel A. Wier. We date the original film to 1947 because the films screening at the downtown theaters - the Ritz, the Georgia, and the Palace - are "The Dark Corner" (released in April 1946), "The Jolson Story" (released in October 1946), "The Razor's Edge" (released in December 1946), and "Valley of Fear" (released in February 1947). The two earlier films may have taken some time to get to Athens after their initial New York and Los Angeles premieres. The more striking aspects of the footage are the extreme differences shown between the houses along Milledge and Prince Avenues, and the African-American neighborhoods, as well as the then fairly new public housing and apartments along Broad Street. These neighborhoods have been identified as "Tip Toe Alley" (between Finley and Newton Streets at Baxter Street) and "Linnentown" (Lumpkin near Baxter), both of which were razed for public housing and for University of Georgia expansion. Also included is footage of local service organization members (Kiwanis, Pilot Club) gathering for lunch downtown, local bankers and businessmen outside their buildings, a scene of the Chamber of Commerce building, aerial views of Athens, a livestock auction at the Northeast Georgia Livestock Association building, a Shriners parade downtown, the airport, UGA campus scenes, the Garden Club of Georgia's Founders Garden, a golf course, Athens General Hospital, and the Rodgers Hosiery Company.

133 reels of film containing home movies from the Patel, Broaddus, Cofer, and Halloran families
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