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5 collections

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1930-2010

The Kaliska-Greenblatt Home Movie Collection is the most locally significant film footage in the home movie collections of the Walter J. Brown Media Archives. The films were taken by William Kaliska and his friend Sidney Greenblatt of Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. Kaliska's films date from the late 1920s to the mid-1930s and show the enthusiasm he had for taking film footage of the varied events he was involved with as a marketing manager for Coca-Cola. The films include the earliest known films of the UGA campus, being scenes at Harold Hirsch Hall (Law School), around the time of its dedication in 1932. Prominent in the group of people in that shot is Coca-Cola's then Vice President in Charge of Sales, Harrison Jones (UGA Class of 1900), later president of the company. This same reel contains the only known footage of Moses Michael, longtime Athens resident. His wife Emma appears with Jean Kaliska in the footage, and the young couple in the segment are the Michaels' son and daughter-in-law, David and Sarah Hall Michael and their children, at their house on Milledge, next to the Phi Epsilon House. Mr. Kaliska filmed carving work on Stone Mountain in 1929, and several university sporting events: a regional track meet at Georgia Tech's campus which includes Olympian Ed Hamm, and the UGA vs. Tech football game in Athens in 1929. He was also in Athens in Sanford Stadium for the UGA v. Tech baseball game and Senior Parade of 1929. Mr. Kaliska also filmed Tech football player Stumpy Thomason and the bear "Bruin" who is shown drinking a Coca-Cola. In July 1930, he was filming from a window of a building along Peachtree Street in Atlanta to capture parts of the July 1930 tickertape parade for Bobby Jones's Grand Slam. The reels also include a trip to Miami that Harold Hirsch took with family and friends. They stayed at one of Miami Beach's most prestigious hotels, the Roney Plaza Hotel. Aside from this and other archival footage, the original Roney Plaza exists only in old photographs and postcards. Hirsch's daughter, Ernestine, and cousin Jake's wife Marjorie and her son Jack are shown sunning at the hotel beachfront. During the trip, Hirsch's group cruised Biscayne Bay, and there are views of many long-gone Miami beachfront buildings, an alligator and an ostrich farm, Seminole Indians, and other cruise ships and lines which regularly traveled to Cuba. Mr. and Mrs. Kaliska were dog fanciers and owned schnauzers. A brief segment of the footage includes Beno Stein, a dog trainer in Atlanta, likely connected with the Atlanta Kennel Club, putting several dogs through a routine around a training obstacle course. One of the reels is of a garden party at the Atlanta mansion of Robert and Nell Woodruff (Coca-Cola magnate and his Athens-born wife) for the wife of a California Coca-Cola executive who was visiting Atlanta. Another depicts a day of fun at the Brookhaven Country Club in 1939 - pitching horseshoes, swimming, golfing, and several people drinking Coca-Cola. There is also footage of a ride in the Goodyear blimp "Defender" from Atlanta Airport around 1930; the footage was used in a 2007 Georgia Public Broadcasting documentary, The South Takes Flight: 100 Years of Aviation in Georgia. The Kaliskas and friends filmed a vacation to the Cumberland Gap area and Nashville, including President Polk's grave, and Kentucky. There are summer camp scenes shot at Camp Victor, connected to the Atlanta Hebrew Orphans Home. There is also footage of the family of prominent Atlanta businessman Victor H. Kriegshaber at their home.

This collection is made up of several different groups of film and videotape which have come to the Media Archives since 1995. As with many collections, not everything produced by the Georgia Center is in the Media Archives, but we hold a broad representation of their material. The Georgia Center and the UGA Art Department at one time maintained a storage building where a once-circulating collection of educational and industrial films were stored. Those films eventually came to the Libraries' Media Archives and have been called the Georgia Center Film Collection. When the Media Archives was established in 1995, those films were brought here. Some of the films date back to the 1930s, though it is likely that these are later reprinted copies of earlier-produced films. The earliest known 2" videotape of a Georgia Center production that we hold was donated to us by Patrick Shields, "A Day with Jimmie Driftwood" which we believe dates to the early 1960s. In 2004, we received the bulk of the Georgia Center's taped programs consisting of tapes of educational programs on campus, continuing education programs, and original productions. A broad range of subjects is covered, including famous Georgians (Dean Rusk, Lamar Dodd, et al.), educational materials, and significant events at the University, among many others.

Five films that highlight Dr. James' dog and opossum behavioral research.
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