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91 collections

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Home movies, professional films, outtakes, audio formats, and videotapes made by "Doc" Tommy Scott during his long career as a musician and traveling medicine show man.

Films documenting travel to Mexico, Barbados, Nassau, England, and home.

Recordings of The Lighthouse, Urban League Broadcast on WBNS, interview of Elizabeth Kytle by Andrew Freeman, and an interview of Elizabeth Kytle by Fannie Hurst.

2 - 16mm film prints

Includes home movies, recordings from BBC, Egyptian broadcasts, and music.

17 audio discs containing radio programs, auditions, and promotional spots

"Pathe Baby was the trade name for a 9.5 mm home movie system introduced in France for Christmas 1922. An extensive catalog of existing Pathe Freres films were issued in this new format. The first were only 30 feet long -- about 90 seconds of cranking. But the innovative freeze frame mechanism lengthened the showing time by not wasting footage on title cards. In 1924, film length was increased to 60 feet. In 1928, Super reel films that were 300 feet long were introduced. 9.5 mm persisted as the 'standard' format in Europe thru the 1950's. Pathex was the trade name of Pathe Exchange, Inc., Pathe's US subsidiary. In America, film exchanges distributed movie releases to theaters. The 9.5 mm format was introduced in America for Christmas of 1925 (Model D projectors)."--pathex.com

Music recorded at Bill Lowery's Southern Tracks studio.

Captain Kangaroo films bought at auction, likely from Keeshan Estate

Media of unknown origin held by Brown Media Archives

133 reels of film containing home movies from the Patel, Broaddus, Cofer, and Halloran families

Recordings of church services and choral and gospel music. Many recordings occurred at historically black colleges and universities (HCBUs) and African American churches. 

An extensive number of videotapes and DVDs, focusing on reunions, the 94th Division's overseas campaigns, and veterans.

Includes recordings of the annual NPPA awards, lectures, Picture of the Year, TV News Clip Contest, Best of TV Photojournalism, and Best of Photojournalism.

Five films that highlight Dr. James' dog and opossum behavioral research.

Major Gibson’s black and white and color home movies span 1942 through 1954 and document family life in base housing, time off with several groups of friends, the interior of base offices, bomber aircraft, and a parade in Butler, Georgia. Particularly of interest is footage of the Gibsons’ son, Bill, as an infant in what is a very typical family home movie scene - walking and crawling on the lawn outside the home with his mother, Wilma. What was a rather ordinary scene becomes more interesting when Mrs. Gibson holds up in front of young Bill a sign reading "14 August 1945 V-J Day Today."

The Ethridge home movies depict life on Southern farm land which was originally settled in 1799 and is now known as the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. The films specifically document the mid-20th century (since 1939), showing Georgia farm life, and the family and Southern travels of Ira Lanis Ethridge.

The collection consists of 8mm home movies from the Dunn family depicting Mexico and the Yucatan, California, Georgia, the Everglades and Jekyll Island. Also included is footage of a wedding.

The collection consists of home movies of the Cearley family. Included are scenes of Georgia, California, Idaho, Dallas, Galveston, Fort Worth, Hawaii, Okinawa, and Oklahoma.

The collection consists of footage of Gordon and Macon (including downtown scenes), Georgia, and families based in Gordon. There are also some early home movies of a kaolin mine's operation that were transferred from their original 16mm to VHS in the 1980s ; the Walter J. Brown Media Archive does not have the original 16mm film. Also included is footage of numerous beach vacation trips in Georgia and Florida, mountain trips, picnics, a trip to England and Scotland, scenes of Central of Georgia railroad trains and stations, a mobile x-ray clinic for tuberculosis, family pets (cat and dog), birthday parties, Zoo Atlanta, Willie B. II gorilla, petting zoos, parades (including centennial of the Civil War parade and a Halloween parade), the Gordon mines, Rock Eagle, Warner Robbins, and miscellaneous family footage.

The collection consists of home movies of the Berry family, who lived in Pennsylvania. Included is footage of their home life, including birthdays, holidays, scenes of children playing and dinner parties; family trips and vacations to many locations including Atlantic City, deserts in the western United States, Disneyland in California (some footage of various rides is included), Yosemite National Park, and Busch Gardens in Florida; and other significant events in their lives.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The collection consists of 1368 radio transcription discs from several UCLA collections. Titles in this collection include: Al Clauser and His Oklahoma Outlaws; The Ballet; Bing Crosby; Carnation Bouquet; Carnation Contented Hour (extensive run); Carnation Family Party; Casey, Crime Photographer; Chuck Wagon Group; Father Knows Best (extensive run); Flynn and Quinn; Good News of 1939; Hallmark Playhouse; Heartbeat Theatre (extensive run); I Can't Leave Her Behind; Labor Arbitration; Lone Journey; Louella Parsons Show; Mystery Is My Hobby (extensive run); NBC Symphony; National Farm and Home Hour; Oklahoma Roundup; President Truman speech; "Red" Carnation Gives a Weekend Party; Rising Tide; Scientific Dissertation; Sons of the Pioneers Show (extensive run); Stars Over Hollywood; Suspense; This Is Your FBI (extensive run); Uncle Tom's Cabin; We're Very Fussy On the Radio/How to Break Into Radio; What's Doin' Ladies.

The collection consists of 10 kinescope reels of "TV Teen Club" programs.

The collection consists of home movies of Geneva Grant's family. Included is footage of Macon, Georgia; a wedding; the family's home; Christmas; Hollywood Beach and Miami, Florida; and Six Flags Over Georgia shortly after it opened.

The collection consists of home movies of Frank Sheffield of Americus, Georgia and his family, recorded over a period of forty years, from 1925-1965. Highlights include footage of England in the 1930s (Trafalgar Square, opening of Parliament, street scenes, the Thames, Whipsnade Zoo, Queen Mary in the historic royal coach); the Harrold-Sheffield wedding; the Sheffields' honeymoon at Lakemont; a dinner party thrown by the Sheffields in 1932; the Sheffield and Harrold family servants; Lindbergh's transatlantic flight; scenes of Americus, Georgia; New Orleans in the 1940s; pyramids in Yucatan, Cuervavaca and Taxco; a Southern Field Flying Jennie airshow from the 1960s; and a trip to Cape Cod.

The collection consists of home movies from the Reap family of Tampa, Florida. Notable places and events covered include Nantahala Forest, ruby mining in Franklin (N.C.), Charleston (Miss.), and the annual celebration of the Gasparilla Invasion in Tampa, Florida. Other films include footage of birthday parties, weddings, and holidays.

The collection consists of home movies from the family of Mary and Philip Ready. There are typical family scenes of birthday parties, holidays, and childrens' dance recitals, but the Ready home movies focus on travel, including footage of New York State, New York City, the World's Fair in British Columbia and Montreal, Niagara Falls, New Jersey, Washington (D.C.), Arlington Cemetary, the Grand Canyon, California, Las Vegas, Yellowstone National Park, and Hawaii.

The collection consists of six reels of home movies showing an outdoor baseball game, a train yard and railroad crew, children playing, beach scenes in Florida, cleanup of a train wreck, and outdoor snow scenes.

The collection consists of home movies from the Hammond family. Included are scenes from World War II, home life, Christmas, a farm and a lake.
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