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66 collections

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Contains aluminum transcription discs of radio programs: Rich's Program and Look Who's Here.

Home movies, professional films, outtakes, audio formats, and videotapes made by "Doc" Tommy Scott during his long career as a musician and traveling medicine show man.

17 audio discs containing radio programs, auditions, and promotional spots

"Pathe Baby was the trade name for a 9.5 mm home movie system introduced in France for Christmas 1922. An extensive catalog of existing Pathe Freres films were issued in this new format. The first were only 30 feet long -- about 90 seconds of cranking. But the innovative freeze frame mechanism lengthened the showing time by not wasting footage on title cards. In 1924, film length was increased to 60 feet. In 1928, Super reel films that were 300 feet long were introduced. 9.5 mm persisted as the 'standard' format in Europe thru the 1950's. Pathex was the trade name of Pathe Exchange, Inc., Pathe's US subsidiary. In America, film exchanges distributed movie releases to theaters. The 9.5 mm format was introduced in America for Christmas of 1925 (Model D projectors)."--pathex.com

Music recorded at Bill Lowery's Southern Tracks studio.

One home movie and one interview. 

133 reels of film containing home movies from the Patel, Broaddus, Cofer, and Halloran families

Recordings of church services and choral and gospel music. Many recordings occurred at historically black colleges and universities (HCBUs) and African American churches. 

An extensive number of videotapes and DVDs, focusing on reunions, the 94th Division's overseas campaigns, and veterans.

Five films that highlight Dr. James' dog and opossum behavioral research.

Major Gibson’s black and white and color home movies span 1942 through 1954 and document family life in base housing, time off with several groups of friends, the interior of base offices, bomber aircraft, and a parade in Butler, Georgia. Particularly of interest is footage of the Gibsons’ son, Bill, as an infant in what is a very typical family home movie scene - walking and crawling on the lawn outside the home with his mother, Wilma. What was a rather ordinary scene becomes more interesting when Mrs. Gibson holds up in front of young Bill a sign reading "14 August 1945 V-J Day Today."

The Ethridge home movies depict life on Southern farm land which was originally settled in 1799 and is now known as the Shields-Ethridge Heritage Farm. The films specifically document the mid-20th century (since 1939), showing Georgia farm life, and the family and Southern travels of Ira Lanis Ethridge.

The collection consists of footage of Gordon and Macon (including downtown scenes), Georgia, and families based in Gordon. There are also some early home movies of a kaolin mine's operation that were transferred from their original 16mm to VHS in the 1980s ; the Walter J. Brown Media Archive does not have the original 16mm film. Also included is footage of numerous beach vacation trips in Georgia and Florida, mountain trips, picnics, a trip to England and Scotland, scenes of Central of Georgia railroad trains and stations, a mobile x-ray clinic for tuberculosis, family pets (cat and dog), birthday parties, Zoo Atlanta, Willie B. II gorilla, petting zoos, parades (including centennial of the Civil War parade and a Halloween parade), the Gordon mines, Rock Eagle, Warner Robbins, and miscellaneous family footage.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The collection consists of 1368 radio transcription discs from several UCLA collections. Titles in this collection include: Al Clauser and His Oklahoma Outlaws; The Ballet; Bing Crosby; Carnation Bouquet; Carnation Contented Hour (extensive run); Carnation Family Party; Casey, Crime Photographer; Chuck Wagon Group; Father Knows Best (extensive run); Flynn and Quinn; Good News of 1939; Hallmark Playhouse; Heartbeat Theatre (extensive run); I Can't Leave Her Behind; Labor Arbitration; Lone Journey; Louella Parsons Show; Mystery Is My Hobby (extensive run); NBC Symphony; National Farm and Home Hour; Oklahoma Roundup; President Truman speech; "Red" Carnation Gives a Weekend Party; Rising Tide; Scientific Dissertation; Sons of the Pioneers Show (extensive run); Stars Over Hollywood; Suspense; This Is Your FBI (extensive run); Uncle Tom's Cabin; We're Very Fussy On the Radio/How to Break Into Radio; What's Doin' Ladies.

The collection consists of home movies from William Oddy, filmed from the 1920s to the 1940s. Locations depicted include Michigan; Ontario; Lake Louise; Banff, Alberta; Alaska; Georgian Bay; and a trip through the southern United States.

The collection consists of home movies of Frank Sheffield of Americus, Georgia and his family, recorded over a period of forty years, from 1925-1965. Highlights include footage of England in the 1930s (Trafalgar Square, opening of Parliament, street scenes, the Thames, Whipsnade Zoo, Queen Mary in the historic royal coach); the Harrold-Sheffield wedding; the Sheffields' honeymoon at Lakemont; a dinner party thrown by the Sheffields in 1932; the Sheffield and Harrold family servants; Lindbergh's transatlantic flight; scenes of Americus, Georgia; New Orleans in the 1940s; pyramids in Yucatan, Cuervavaca and Taxco; a Southern Field Flying Jennie airshow from the 1960s; and a trip to Cape Cod.

The collection consists of six reels of home movies showing an outdoor baseball game, a train yard and railroad crew, children playing, beach scenes in Florida, cleanup of a train wreck, and outdoor snow scenes.

The collection consists of home movies from the Hammond family. Included are scenes from World War II, home life, Christmas, a farm and a lake.

The collection consists of John Newman's home movies, including a reel of construction sites of buildings built by his father's construction business, Newman Construction Company; Newman Construction Company's projects in 1937, 1938 and 1939 (including several Public Works Administration projects); and one short reel of John F. Kennedy's appearance at the La Grange, Georgia, airport in October 1960. Other scenes from Newman's home movies include children's birthdays, holidays, a wedding (with footage of the bride preparing for the ceremony and the table of gifts), Panama City (Florida), Christmas, and school pageants, as well as other scenes around LaGrange, Georgia. The films were shot by John R. Newman (father of Fred Newman) and Claire Newman.

The Rayburn Moore collection consists of footage related to the Moore family. Also included are two reels of film showing touring performances of KFFA Radio's "King Biscuit Time," and one reel showing a walking tour around Ralston Purina's Research Farm outside of St. Louis, Missouri. One of the King Biscuit Time reels is a circa 1943 country store performance by blues artists Sonny Boy Williamson and Robert Junior Lockwood. The second King Biscuit Time reel is a 1952 bus performing tour of various Arkansas locations by Sonny Boy Williamson and other African-American performers.

The collection consists of home movies from the McNeel family. Highlights include footage of McNeel Marble Company, a large builder of monuments located in Marietta, Georgia.

The collection consists of home movies from the family of Dr. Gail Jackson. Included is footage of a 1947 road trip on Route 66 West from Joplin, Missouri to Flagstaff, Arizona, the Grand Canyon, Utah and Colorado, and other locations; a 1948 trip through the Tetons, Yellowstone, Cheyenne, etc, and a dude ranch; a Castle Heights graduation featuring Bernarr MacFadden; an Officer Candidate School graduation in Newport, Rhode Island; and miscellaneous events in the family's life, such as scenes of the farm and home, snow in Vincennes, and a birthday party for Frederic L. Jackson.

The collection consists of footage shot in various locations, including Orangeburg and Edisto Beach, South Carolina (c. 1946/1947); Iran and Portugal (1964); and Berlin, Prague and Portofino (1965). There is also footage of marlin fishing in Mexico in June, 1965. Included is a purchased black-and-white film about Florida water park acts entitled "Aqua Frolics."

The collection consists of Louis C. Harris, Sr.'s entire home movie collection (1942-1960) of silent, black-and-white and color, camera-original, 8mm and 16mm home movie footage shot between 1942 and 1960 in Italy; Algiers; Augusta, Georgia; Florida; South Carolina; and Yucca Flat, Nevada; and three commercial 16mm films. The National Film Preservation Foundation generously funded full film preservation of several reels of Mr. Harris's home movies. Three reels of Kodachrome document a July, 8 1953 soap box derby sponsored by the Augusta Chronicle. But three months before this innocent American pastime, Mr. Harris was invited by the government, as a member of the press, to witness a 16-kiloton atomic blast at Yucca Flat, Nevada, on March 17, 1953. He made a short Kodachrome 16mm film of his trip west which includes scenes at the Phoenix, Arizona airport; day and evening shots of the Las Vegas Strip including the famous "Vegas Vic" waving cowboy neon sign erected in 1951 (the Pioneer Club casino which it advertised closed in 1995); at Indian Springs AFB where atomic bomb drop planes were being "decontaminated" with water and brooms after blast flyovers; at the test location with other journalists being briefed; the atomic blast itself; and colleagues present just after the test. His newspaper accounts of the events that week (available on microfilm in the UGA Main Library) describe the safety of the test and the need for Americans to prepare for potential nuclear war. The family's papers and Mr. Harris's home audio disc recordings are also at UGA.

Because of its business and housing content, we believe this 16mm color amateur film of scenes in and around Athens was made by Joel A. Wier. We date the original film to 1947 because the films screening at the downtown theaters - the Ritz, the Georgia, and the Palace - are "The Dark Corner" (released in April 1946), "The Jolson Story" (released in October 1946), "The Razor's Edge" (released in December 1946), and "Valley of Fear" (released in February 1947). The two earlier films may have taken some time to get to Athens after their initial New York and Los Angeles premieres. The more striking aspects of the footage are the extreme differences shown between the houses along Milledge and Prince Avenues, and the African-American neighborhoods, as well as the then fairly new public housing and apartments along Broad Street. These neighborhoods have been identified as "Tip Toe Alley" (between Finley and Newton Streets at Baxter Street) and "Linnentown" (Lumpkin near Baxter), both of which were razed for public housing and for University of Georgia expansion. Also included is footage of local service organization members (Kiwanis, Pilot Club) gathering for lunch downtown, local bankers and businessmen outside their buildings, a scene of the Chamber of Commerce building, aerial views of Athens, a livestock auction at the Northeast Georgia Livestock Association building, a Shriners parade downtown, the airport, UGA campus scenes, the Garden Club of Georgia's Founders Garden, a golf course, Athens General Hospital, and the Rodgers Hosiery Company.

The collection consists of home movies of Nancy Stephens and her family, dating from circa 1929-1960. Some films document Stephens College, which Nancy attended. There is also early footage (1929, 1930) of several men golfing. Otherwise, the footage consists primarily of family members and friends at birthday parties, Christmas, weddings; children playing outdoors, family pets; travel to Louisiana, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Washington (D.C.), Portland (Oregon), Colorado Springs, Canada, Kansas City and Plattsburg (Missouri).

The collection consists of sound recordings of Elmo Ellis editorials.

The collection consists of 14 Bankers boxes of audiocasssettes containing over 3100 radio programs taped off-air. Programs include: That Was the Week That Was; Frontier Gentleman; G.I. Journal; The Cavalcade of America; Studio One; Lum and Abner, etc.

1930-2010

The collection consists of audio recordings and segments of various programs penned by Sloane, as well as recordings of some of his lectures, interviews, and phone conferences. Among the programs available are The Right to Live (1947, NBC) and Joy of Bach (1978). The only videocassette in the collection is a recording of part one of Kids Like These.
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