Wide Angle. [2003-07-31], To Have and Have Not


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Created: 2003

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Wide Angle. [2003-09-18], The Dammed
Summary: "A weekly series of one-hour documentaries on international current events, WIDE ANGLE brings needed in-depth reporting on global issues to the primetime American television audience. Devoid of American correspondents, think-tank analysts and scholars, the films offer an intimate, firsthand view of people's lives and experiences and an unfiltered look at important global events, as they are unfolding. The season launch, 'Exclusive to Al-Jazeera,' featured a behind-the-scenes look at the Arabic news network's coverage of the Iraqi war. Also in season 2: a rare portrait of life inside North Korea; the Angolan military's bold new campaign to combat AIDS; the global crisis in access to primary education; the conflict between Pakistan's moderate Islamic voices and religious hardliners; Berlusconi's impact on Italy's democracy; the growing political power of Bolivia's indigenous people; black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa; and the human costs of the construction of one of the world's largest dams in India. The season finale, filmed in 16 different countries, exposed the worldwide boom in illicit human smuggling and human trafficking.

"Following each film, an interview with a high-profile guest links the issues in the documentary with American concerns. Season Two guests included Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, writer Arundhati Roy, Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen, and Senator Hillary Clinton. The guests were interviewed by co-hosts Jamie Rubin (former Assistant Secretary of State) and Mishal Husain (Washington correspondent for BBC News and anchor of its World News broadcast).

"A growing network of international filmmakers enriches WIDE ANGLE's reporting, broadening the points of view available to American audiences. 'Road to Riches' featured the reporting of the black South African economics journalist Itumeleng Mahabane; 'A State of Mind' was the result of the British producers' unique degree of access in North Korea. The 'Time for School' segments were directed by filmmakers from Brazil, Paris, Senegal, London, and New York.

"The Wall Street Journal called WIDE ANGLE 'Unerringly first-class.' Said The New York Times, 'In a television landscape where network news is dominated by tiny sound bites and cable by shouting heads, WIDE ANGLE has a distinct and valuable place.' Meticulously researched, each WIDE ANGLE aims to portray the humanity behind the headlines through character-driven stories illuminating the larger geopolitical forces at work in the world today. We believe the series deserves consideration by the Peabody committee because by deepening [Americans'] awareness of global issues it meets a profound need in the television schedule."--2003 Peabody Awards entry form.

This episode, "The Dammed," looks at the human costs of India's Sardar Sarovar dam. India has a long history of dam-building, but the dams have often been underfunded and poorly constructed, and their construction has frequently caused severe environmental damage. Although India can clearly benefit from increased hydropower and better control of irrigation, many contend that the human and environmental costs of the Sardar Sarovar dam are too high.

Corporate Producers: WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)

Persons Appearing: Jamie Rubin (Host) | Mishal Husain (Host)

Broadcast Date: August 18, 2003

Wide Angle. [2003-07-10], Exclusive to Al-Jazeera
Summary: "A weekly series of one-hour documentaries on international current events, WIDE ANGLE brings needed in-depth reporting on global issues to the primetime American television audience. Devoid of American correspondents, think-tank analysts and scholars, the films offer an intimate, firsthand view of people's lives and experiences and an unfiltered look at important global events, as they are unfolding. The season launch, 'Exclusive to Al-Jazeera,' featured a behind-the-scenes look at the Arabic news network's coverage of the Iraqi war. Also in season 2: a rare portrait of life inside North Korea; the Angolan military's bold new campaign to combat AIDS; the global crisis in access to primary education; the conflict between Pakistan's moderate Islamic voices and religious hardliners; Berlusconi's impact on Italy's democracy; the growing political power of Bolivia's indigenous people; black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa; and the human costs of the construction of one of the world's largest dams in India. The season finale, filmed in 16 different countries, exposed the worldwide boom in illicit human smuggling and human trafficking.

"Following each film, an interview with a high-profile guest links the issues in the documentary with American concerns. Season Two guests included Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, writer Arundhati Roy, Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen, and Senator Hillary Clinton. The guests were interviewed by co-hosts Jamie Rubin (former Assistant Secretary of State) and Mishal Husain (Washington correspondent for BBC News and anchor of its World News broadcast).

"A growing network of international filmmakers enriches WIDE ANGLE's reporting, broadening the points of view available to American audiences. 'Road to Riches' featured the reporting of the black South African economics journalist Itumeleng Mahabane; 'A State of Mind' was the result of the British producers' unique degree of access in North Korea. The 'Time for School' segments were directed by filmmakers from Brazil, Paris, Senegal, London, and New York.

"The Wall Street Journal called WIDE ANGLE 'Unerringly first-class.' Said The New York Times, 'In a television landscape where network news is dominated by tiny sound bites and cable by shouting heads, WIDE ANGLE has a distinct and valuable place.' Meticulously researched, each WIDE ANGLE aims to portray the humanity behind the headlines through character-driven stories illuminating the larger geopolitical forces at work in the world today. We believe the series deserves consideration by the Peabody committee because by deepening [Americans'] awareness of global issues it meets a profound need in the television schedule."--2003 Peabody Awards entry form.

This is "Exclusive to Al-Jazeera," described above. "For a satellite channel that broadcasts only in Arabic, al-Jazeera has achieved an astonishing level of recognition way beyond the Arab world. To understand why this is so is to understand some key contradictions of contemporary media and global politics. Here is a TV station inspired by the format of American programs such as CROSSFIRE and LARRY KING LIVE. Yet it has been denounced as a dangerous anti-American force in newspapers such as the NEW YORK DAILY NEWS and the NEW YORK TIMES. Here is a TV station where Western-trained staff apply Western criteria of newsworthiness ('what bleeds, leads'), yet find themselves accused of radicalizing public opinion and fomenting unrest. At the heart of the contradictions is a history of stifling state censorship in an increasingly angry Arab world."--episode description from PBS Web site for the series (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/shows/aljazeera/index.html) accessed 2005-09-13.

Corporate Producers: WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)

Persons Appearing: Jamie Rubin (Host) | Mishal Husain (Host)

Broadcast Date: July 10, 2003

Wide Angle. [2003-08-07], Coca and the Congressman
Summary: "A weekly series of one-hour documentaries on international current events, WIDE ANGLE brings needed in-depth reporting on global issues to the primetime American television audience. Devoid of American correspondents, think-tank analysts and scholars, the films offer an intimate, firsthand view of people's lives and experiences and an unfiltered look at important global events, as they are unfolding. The season launch, 'Exclusive to Al-Jazeera,' featured a behind-the-scenes look at the Arabic news network's coverage of the Iraqi war. Also in season 2: a rare portrait of life inside North Korea; the Angolan military's bold new campaign to combat AIDS; the global crisis in access to primary education; the conflict between Pakistan's moderate Islamic voices and religious hardliners; Berlusconi's impact on Italy's democracy; the growing political power of Bolivia's indigenous people; black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa; and the human costs of the construction of one of the world's largest dams in India. The season finale, filmed in 16 different countries, exposed the worldwide boom in illicit human smuggling and human trafficking.

"Following each film, an interview with a high-profile guest links the issues in the documentary with American concerns. Season Two guests included Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, writer Arundhati Roy, Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen, and Senator Hillary Clinton. The guests were interviewed by co-hosts Jamie Rubin (former Assistant Secretary of State) and Mishal Husain (Washington correspondent for BBC News and anchor of its World News broadcast).

"A growing network of international filmmakers enriches WIDE ANGLE's reporting, broadening the points of view available to American audiences. 'Road to Riches' featured the reporting of the black South African economics journalist Itumeleng Mahabane; 'A State of Mind' was the result of the British producers' unique degree of access in North Korea. The 'Time for School' segments were directed by filmmakers from Brazil, Paris, Senegal, London, and New York.

"The Wall Street Journal called WIDE ANGLE 'Unerringly first-class.' Said The New York Times, 'In a television landscape where network news is dominated by tiny sound bites and cable by shouting heads, WIDE ANGLE has a distinct and valuable place.' Meticulously researched, each WIDE ANGLE aims to portray the humanity behind the headlines through character-driven stories illuminating the larger geopolitical forces at work in the world today. We believe the series deserves consideration by the Peabody committee because by deepening [Americans'] awareness of global issues it meets a profound need in the television schedule."--2003 Peabody Awards entry form.

This episode is "Coca and the Congressman." Ex-congressman Evo Morales leads 'cocaleros' against the Bolivian military's crop eradication program. This prescient documentary predicted the ensuing resignation of the President, rise of the indigenous people and subsequent revolution. The rise of new leftist leaders in South America has been swift and surprising. From Venezuela's Chavez to Brazil's Lula, from Argentina's Kirchner to Peru's Toledo, the swelling ranks of left-leaning governments have provoked fear among some conservatives. If the proverbial dominos are on the table -- will Bolivia be the next to tip over? In recent years the country has been roiled by competing political forces, with the indigenous coca grower's union (the 'Cocaleros') becoming an unexpected powerhouse. Their hero is ex-congressman Evo Morales, a former coca farmer from indigenous peasant roots, who rose up last year to defend the coca growers against the Bolivian military's crop eradication program. Today Latin America's highest profile indigenous leader, Morales fell just 45,000 votes shy of the presidency in the country's June 2002 election. This summer, as the standoff between the cocaleros and the government escalated, DCTV traveled with Morales to the stunning highlands of Bolivia as he fights to expand the amount of coca that can be legally grown by farmers. The pitfalls of a drug-based economy -- and the difficulty of finding suitable replacement crops to support peasant families -- are all part of the story. We profile powerful indigenous politicians working with Morales, a poor Cocalero family whose survival is dependent on coca growing, the poor miners slaving away in Potosi, and a coca-eradication commander on a slash and burn mission. Coca and the Congressman illuminates the shifting balance of power that's underway in Bolivia -- and spreading across Latin America."--2003 Peabody Awards entry form description for 2003342 DCT.

Corporate Producers: WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)

Persons Appearing: Jamie Rubin (Host) | Mishal Husain (Host)

Broadcast Date: August 7, 2003

Wide Angle. [2003-08-21], The Prime Minister and the Press
Summary: "A weekly series of one-hour documentaries on international current events, WIDE ANGLE brings needed in-depth reporting on global issues to the primetime American television audience. Devoid of American correspondents, think-tank analysts and scholars, the films offer an intimate, firsthand view of people's lives and experiences and an unfiltered look at important global events, as they are unfolding. The season launch, 'Exclusive to Al-Jazeera,' featured a behind-the-scenes look at the Arabic news network's coverage of the Iraqi war. Also in season 2: a rare portrait of life inside North Korea; the Angolan military's bold new campaign to combat AIDS; the global crisis in access to primary education; the conflict between Pakistan's moderate Islamic voices and religious hardliners; Berlusconi's impact on Italy's democracy; the growing political power of Bolivia's indigenous people; black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa; and the human costs of the construction of one of the world's largest dams in India. The season finale, filmed in 16 different countries, exposed the worldwide boom in illicit human smuggling and human trafficking.

"Following each film, an interview with a high-profile guest links the issues in the documentary with American concerns. Season Two guests included Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, writer Arundhati Roy, Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen, and Senator Hillary Clinton. The guests were interviewed by co-hosts Jamie Rubin (former Assistant Secretary of State) and Mishal Husain (Washington correspondent for BBC News and anchor of its World News broadcast).

"A growing network of international filmmakers enriches WIDE ANGLE's reporting, broadening the points of view available to American audiences. 'Road to Riches' featured the reporting of the black South African economics journalist Itumeleng Mahabane; 'A State of Mind' was the result of the British producers' unique degree of access in North Korea. The 'Time for School' segments were directed by filmmakers from Brazil, Paris, Senegal, London, and New York.

"The Wall Street Journal called WIDE ANGLE 'Unerringly first-class.' Said The New York Times, 'In a television landscape where network news is dominated by tiny sound bites and cable by shouting heads, WIDE ANGLE has a distinct and valuable place.' Meticulously researched, each WIDE ANGLE aims to portray the humanity behind the headlines through character-driven stories illuminating the larger geopolitical forces at work in the world today. We believe the series deserves consideration by the Peabody committee because by deepening [Americans'] awareness of global issues it meets a profound need in the television schedule."--2003 Peabody Awards entry form.

This episode is "The Prime Minister and the Press." "Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is not only Italy's richest man, but also the unrivaled owner of a vast media empire. Critics suggest that Berlusconi's combination of political power and editorial control have endangered freedom of the press in Italy."--episode description from PBS Web site for the series (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/shows/berlusconi/index.html) accessed 2005-09-13.

Corporate Producers: WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)

Persons Appearing: Jamie Rubin (Host) | Mishal Husain (Host)

Broadcast Date: August 21, 2003

Wide Angle. [2003-07-31], To Have and Have Not
Summary: "A weekly series of one-hour documentaries on international current events, WIDE ANGLE brings needed in-depth reporting on global issues to the primetime American television audience. Devoid of American correspondents, think-tank analysts and scholars, the films offer an intimate, firsthand view of people's lives and experiences and an unfiltered look at important global events, as they are unfolding. The season launch, 'Exclusive to Al-Jazeera,' featured a behind-the-scenes look at the Arabic news network's coverage of the Iraqi war. Also in season 2: a rare portrait of life inside North Korea; the Angolan military's bold new campaign to combat AIDS; the global crisis in access to primary education; the conflict between Pakistan's moderate Islamic voices and religious hardliners; Berlusconi's impact on Italy's democracy; the growing political power of Bolivia's indigenous people; black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa; and the human costs of the construction of one of the world's largest dams in India. The season finale, filmed in 16 different countries, exposed the worldwide boom in illicit human smuggling and human trafficking.

"Following each film, an interview with a high-profile guest links the issues in the documentary with American concerns. Season Two guests included Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, writer Arundhati Roy, Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen, and Senator Hillary Clinton. The guests were interviewed by co-hosts Jamie Rubin (former Assistant Secretary of State) and Mishal Husain (Washington correspondent for BBC News and anchor of its World News broadcast).

"A growing network of international filmmakers enriches WIDE ANGLE's reporting, broadening the points of view available to American audiences. 'Road to Riches' featured the reporting of the black South African economics journalist Itumeleng Mahabane; 'A State of Mind' was the result of the British producers' unique degree of access in North Korea. The 'Time for School' segments were directed by filmmakers from Brazil, Paris, Senegal, London, and New York.

"The Wall Street Journal called WIDE ANGLE 'Unerringly first-class.' Said The New York Times, 'In a television landscape where network news is dominated by tiny sound bites and cable by shouting heads, WIDE ANGLE has a distinct and valuable place.' Meticulously researched, each WIDE ANGLE aims to portray the humanity behind the headlines through character-driven stories illuminating the larger geopolitical forces at work in the world today. We believe the series deserves consideration by the Peabody committee because by deepening [Americans'] awareness of global issues it meets a profound need in the television schedule."--2003 Peabody Awards entry form.

This episode is "To Have and Have Not." It looks at the extremes of wealth and poverty in China and examines the dramatic upheaval China is undergoing as a result of its membership to the World Trade Organization and its new commitment to free markets.

Corporate Producers: WNET (Television station : New York, N.Y.)

Persons Appearing: Jamie Rubin (Host) | Mishal Husain (Host)

Broadcast Date: July 31, 2003