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251 collections

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Completed as-aired programs as well as raw footage for the program. The archival material exists on various formats of videotape and on 16mm film.

This collection contains films, videos, and radio spots produced by the Atlanta Gas Light Company from the 1950s through 1970s. It includes home movies of company events, training and promotional films, commercials, and footage of the Mrs. Georgia Pageant in the 1960s.

This is a public affairs program produced by Mike Pasquale at the UGA Georgia Center for Continuing Education studios in 1992 and 1993.

The collection consists of production elements and video recordings of interviews and other footage related to Harry Crews and to the making of the documentary "Harry Crews: Guilty as Charged."

The collection consists of footage related to Del Ward from 1987-1997. Included are recordings from WMAZ, Del at Macon College and Wesleyan College, and various promotional spots.

The collection consists of raw footage from all around Georgia from 1992-2003. Some of the footage was used in the Discover America series. Locations filmed include Atlanta, Savannah, St. Simons, Columbus, Dawsonville, Peachtree City and Valdosta.

Some off-air recordings, some purchased/commercial recordings, some dubs of interviews. Most related to Vince Dooley and Georgia Bulldogs football.

The collection consists of sound recordings of Elmo Ellis editorials.

The collection consists of a 32.5 minute film, probably shot for insurance purposes, which focuses on the devastation of the commercial and governmental center of Gainesville, but also includes footage of damage to nearby residential areas. In particular, it features the damage to the public square, the county courthouse, the Georgia Power Company, the Cooper Pants Factory, and the First Methodist Church. The 1936 Gainesville tornado (part of a massive tornado outbreak across the Deep South that also heavily damaged Tupelo, Mississippi) is generally regarded as the fifth deadliest in U.S. history. Extensive recovery efforts involving many local, regional, state, and national resources eventually rebuilt Gainesville, culminating in the 1938 dedication of the new city hall and county courthouse by President Franklin Roosevelt.

Production materials related to the making of the film "You can't judge a book by looking at its cover," a documentary about actor John O'Neal and his creative processes. Filmed in Chicago and Atlanta, the film documents and explores O'Neal's relation to his community and the ways he incorporates history and lived experience to depict the destructive consequences of rural to urban migration through a fictional character, Junebug Jabbo Jones.
Mr. O'Neal was a member of SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, in the 1960s and was the founder of the Free Southern Theater. He died in 2019.

Audio field recordings made in coastal and North Georgia by Art Rosenbaum, primarily between 1976 and 1983, with one each from 1955 and 1966. Musicians were recorded in their homes and churches. Some oral histories are included along with performances. Genres represented include old-time string band music, gospel, ballads, blues, work songs, shout songs, banjo picking, and religious singing. Performers include the McIntosh County Shouters, Howard Finster, Neal Pattman, Gordon Tanner, Joe Rakestraw, Jake Staggers, the Eller Brothers with Ross Brown, Doc and Lucy Barnes, and W. Guy Bruce.

The films are of the Ehrlich family. Louis B. Ehrlich took the two 16mm films at the Ehrlich family home in Bainbridge, Georgia. Depicted are Henry B. Ehrlich, Sarah Ehrlich, Bartow Ehrlich, and others. Also on the film is footage of the dirigible airship Akron and an American LaFrance fire truck, an example of early motorized fire equipment. The VHS is a copy of reels 1 and 2 and also includes a children's play acted and titled scene of a fight between some boys and is called, "An Affair of Honor".
 

Includes recordings of Hugh Hodgson, Nelson Eddy albums, and various others.

Consists of recordings related to Gene Sarazan, Hank Aaron, Jimmy Demaret, Sam Snead, Ty Cobb, and ESPN Sports Century.

Meet the Author: Robert Burch

Gone With the Wind Premiere Home Move, 1939, silent. Footage made for Mayor Hartsfield during the days surrounding the Atlanta premiere of the film, GONE WITH THE WIND. The date code of this print is 1965, but a note on the leader states that it was made in 1960. This is definitely a print of another print.

Includes Junior League Ball, Mayor William Hartsfield, Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, Vivien Leigh, Margaret Mitchell, Ann Rutherford, Olivia de Havilland, Jock Whitney, David O. Selznick, Laurence Olivier, Ginny Simms, Kay Kyser, Governor Rivers, Confederate veterans, Major Clark Howell, Cyclorama Building, Battle of Peachtree Creek site.

Living Atlanta by Radio Free Georgia Broadcasting Foundation consists of audiotapes on Atlanta topics including race relations, World War II, Gone With The Wind, Black civic and social life, Atlanta's Jewish community, and unions and strikes.

Includes audio recordings of Dateline America, The World Today (1983-1984), and Georgia Crossroads (1983) and several films including Ernest Vandiver in Milledgeville, Georgia.

The collection consists of videotaped entries to the Atlanta Film Festival, including their gay and lesbian/LGBTQ festival entries (both documentaries and drama). There are also many animated titles by artists such as Aardman Animations and animator Bill Plympton. In addition, there are festival promotional films consisting of compilations of festival entries.

The collection consists of 21 films made by J. Aubrey Smith, donated by him in 2001, along with camera equipment he used and records he kept from his work (such as log books, maps to locations, notes on filming techniques, camera manuals, etc.). Smith's films were made for the Agricultural Extension Service. Some of them were sponsored by Rich's Department store. As sponsored films, they have a subtle or sometimes quite blatant message since the purpose of a sponsored film is to teach about or exhort the viewer to use a service or product. Since he was working for an agricultural entity, these films are primarily about improving agriculture, growing better crops, eliminating insects, and being efficient in the home and on the farm. During the post-World War II years as America was expanding economically, these films promoted the idea that a better life could be had through education, proper exploitation of local resources (such as the Agricultural Extension Service), more efficient use of home and farm equipment, all by tapping in to the improvements that had come from the war. The result would be an improvement of one's community by improving one's life, whether that be by using chemical pesticides, buying one's draperies at Rich's, joining a co-op, or learning new farming methods.

The collection consists of audio of "Reflections on Georgia" that were produced for broadcast on WUGA on old farm ways, saints and spirits, etc. Also included is audio of "Folklore in Georgia" featuring performances of local folk musicians including Howard Finster. "Bicentennial Minutes" features information about Georgia and UGA.

The collection consists of tapes of the Pam & Buffy Show, a children's program that aired on Atlanta cable television from 1993-2001. Topics covered include living drug-free, recycling, etiquette, self-esteem, holidays, and personal hygiene.

The collection consists of audio recordings from the Savannah Music Festival during the first decade of the 21st century.

Because of its business and housing content, we believe this 16mm color amateur film of scenes in and around Athens was made by Joel A. Wier. We date the original film to 1947 because the films screening at the downtown theaters - the Ritz, the Georgia, and the Palace - are "The Dark Corner" (released in April 1946), "The Jolson Story" (released in October 1946), "The Razor's Edge" (released in December 1946), and "Valley of Fear" (released in February 1947). The two earlier films may have taken some time to get to Athens after their initial New York and Los Angeles premieres. The more striking aspects of the footage are the extreme differences shown between the houses along Milledge and Prince Avenues, and the African-American neighborhoods, as well as the then fairly new public housing and apartments along Broad Street. These neighborhoods have been identified as "Tip Toe Alley" (between Finley and Newton Streets at Baxter Street) and "Linnentown" (Lumpkin near Baxter), both of which were razed for public housing and for University of Georgia expansion. Also included is footage of local service organization members (Kiwanis, Pilot Club) gathering for lunch downtown, local bankers and businessmen outside their buildings, a scene of the Chamber of Commerce building, aerial views of Athens, a livestock auction at the Northeast Georgia Livestock Association building, a Shriners parade downtown, the airport, UGA campus scenes, the Garden Club of Georgia's Founders Garden, a golf course, Athens General Hospital, and the Rodgers Hosiery Company.

The collection consists of one reel of footage of the town of Bowman, Georgia in 1938.

The Underground sound collection was donated by Robbie Collins who ran Underground Sound Recording Studio and recorded Athens, Georgia bands. Included in his donation are recordings of: R.E.M., Love Tractor, Vic Varney, and Go Van Go. The recordings are from 1987-1992 on 1/2" and 1/4" open reel.

This collection contains approximately 2000 1/4" open reels and cartridges (or carts) from the University of Georgia student-run radio station WUOG. The recordings run from 1973 until approximately 2003 and contain original programs and recordings. Some of the programs in the collection feature performances by REM, the B52s, Pylon, and Love Tractor, among others.

The collection consists of one silent film of people from a small town edited with title cards that are meant to be humorous. It contains racially insensitive material.

The Andrew Avery Home Movie Collection documents the people and events of Bainbridge, Georgia and Decatur County from 1934 to the early 1950s in over 8000 feet of film that lasts for over 200 minutes.
To view indexes for each movie, please see the Avery Home Movies OHMS page.

The collection consists of Louis C. Harris, Sr.'s entire home movie collection (1942-1960) of silent, black-and-white and color, camera-original, 8mm and 16mm home movie footage shot between 1942 and 1960 in Italy; Algiers; Augusta, Georgia; Florida; South Carolina; and Yucca Flat, Nevada; and three commercial 16mm films. The National Film Preservation Foundation generously funded full film preservation of several reels of Mr. Harris's home movies. Three reels of Kodachrome document a July, 8 1953 soap box derby sponsored by the Augusta Chronicle. But three months before this innocent American pastime, Mr. Harris was invited by the government, as a member of the press, to witness a 16-kiloton atomic blast at Yucca Flat, Nevada, on March 17, 1953. He made a short Kodachrome 16mm film of his trip west which includes scenes at the Phoenix, Arizona airport; day and evening shots of the Las Vegas Strip including the famous "Vegas Vic" waving cowboy neon sign erected in 1951 (the Pioneer Club casino which it advertised closed in 1995); at Indian Springs AFB where atomic bomb drop planes were being "decontaminated" with water and brooms after blast flyovers; at the test location with other journalists being briefed; the atomic blast itself; and colleagues present just after the test. His newspaper accounts of the events that week (available on microfilm in the UGA Main Library) describe the safety of the test and the need for Americans to prepare for potential nuclear war. The family's papers and Mr. Harris's home audio disc recordings are also at UGA.
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